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Archive for September, 2021

Blessings

This week’s inspiring video: Blessings
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KarmaTube.org

Video of the Week

Sep 30, 2021
Blessings

Blessings

Poet David Whyte takes us with him on a visual journey across the Irish countryside with this reading of his poems which bless both sound and light. The soul-touching music composed by Owen Ó Súilleabháin accompanies this journey in which sounds and sights provide ways of knowing that "I am here". Each day blesses us with original music and the light through which everything becomes an eye to everything else.
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The Wisdom of Salmon

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DailyGood News That Inspires

September 30, 2021

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The Wisdom of Salmon

Wherever love is, I want to be, I will follow it as surely as the land-locked salmon finds the sea.

– Jeanette Wiinterson –

The Wisdom of Salmon

What can salmon teach us about sustainability in a complex environment? Marine biologist Alexandra Morton shares startling new research that lets us decode the information stored in a salmon’s immune system. The data reveals where we’re harming the fish, the ocean, and ourselves — ultimately revealing lessons for how humans can thrive on this planet without destroying it. { read more }

Be The Change

Listen to the wisdom the natural world is sharing about how to thrive as part of the environment you live in.

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Calling Team Earth

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DailyGood News That Inspires

September 29, 2021

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Calling Team Earth

All is connected… no one thing can change by itself.

– Paul Hawken –

Calling Team Earth

“Paul Hawken is a world-renowned environmentalist, activist, and author. His works include Blessed Unrest, Drawdown, and Sustainable Revolution. In this episode of Insights at the Edge, Tami Simon speaks with Paul about the call to action in his newest book, Regeneration: Ending the Climate Crisis in One Generation. Paul and Tami discuss the accelerating effects of climate change and how global society might respond. Paul comments on the lack of public engagement with the situation, emphasizing that old and entrenched human behavioral patterns wont solve the problem. Tami and Paul talk about the nature of social change, resources for everyday climate action, and the fascinating climate-shifting possibilities of the Azolla fern. Finally, they speak on the importance of staying active and joyous even when the scale of the crisis feels overwhelming.” { read more }

Be The Change

Join upcoming calls with an inspiring line-up of change-makers in this “Law of Love” series honoring Mahatma Gandhi’s birthday. { more }

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Getting Back in Time

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DailyGood News That Inspires

September 28, 2021

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Getting Back in Time

When we are being, not only are we collaborating with chronological time, but we are touching on kairos and are freed from the normal restrictions of time.

– Madeleine L’Engle –

Getting Back in Time

“Time has a hold on us, there is no escaping it. Sometimes it can seem to govern our lives: we’re pressed for it; we don’t have any; it’s running out. We need to be on time and in time. At other ‘times’ we can find we have got time on our hands — or better, the ease of having all the time in the world. It is such a vital aspect of our lives that telling the time is one of the first skills we teach our children. However, after the early years of primary school, and despite its ever-presence and undoubted significance, time disappears from the curriculum.” In this thoughtful essay, Richard Gault explores the difference between clock time, and the Greek notion of ‘kairos’, or ‘knowing the right moment,’ and surfaces ways in which technology has radically altered our relationship to time. { read more }

Be The Change

For more inspiration, check out this On Being interview with Richard Rohr, “Living in Deep Time.” { more }

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The World Feeling And The Soul Feeling

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InnerNet Weekly: Inspirations from ServiceSpace.org
The World Feeling And The Soul Feeling
by Anthony de Mello

[Listen to Audio!]

2515.jpgFor what will it profit a man, if he gains the whole world and forfeits
his life? —Matthew 16:26

Recall the kind of feeling you have when someone praises you, when you are approved, accepted, applauded. And contrast that with the kind of feel­ing that arises within you when you look at the sun­set or the sunrise or Nature in general, or when you read a book or watch a movie that you thoroughly enjoy. Get the taste of this feeling and contrast it with the first, namely, the one that was generated within you when you were praised. Understand that the first type of feeling comes from self-glorification, self-promotion. It is a worldly feeling. The second comes from self-fulfillment, a soul feeling.

Here is another contrast: Recall the kind of feeling you have when you succeed, when you have made it, when you get to the top, when you win a game or a bet or an argument. And contrast it with the kind of feeling you get when you really enjoy the job you are doing, you are absorbed in, the action that you are currently engaged in. And once again notice the qualitative difference between the worldly feeling and the soul feeling.

Yet another contrast: Remember what you felt like when you had power, you were the boss, peo­ple looked up to you, took orders from you; or when you were popular. And contrast that worldly feeling with the feeling of intimacy, companionship—the times you thoroughly enjoyed yourself in the com­pany of a friend or with a group in which there was fun and laughter.

Having done this, attempt to understand the true nature of worldly feelings, namely, the feelings of self-promotion, self-glorification. They are not nat­ural, they were invented by your society and your culture to make you productive and to make you controllable. These feelings do not produce the nour­ishment and happiness that is produced when one contemplates Nature or enjoys the company of one’s friends or one’s work. They were meant to produce thrills, excitement—and emptiness.

Then observe yourself in the course of a day or a week and think how many actions of yours are performed, how many activities engaged in that are uncontaminated by the desire for these thrills, these excitements that only produce emptiness, the desire for attention, approval, fame, popularity, success or power.

And take a look at the people around you. Is there a single one of them who has not become addicted to these worldly feelings? A single one who is not controlled by them, hungers for them, spends every minute of his/her waking life consciously or unconsciously seeking them? When you see this you will understand how people attempt to gain the world and, in the process, lose their soul. For they live empty, soulless lives.

And here is a parable of life for you to ponder on: A group of tourists sits in a bus that is passing through gorgeously beautiful country; lakes and mountains and green fields and rivers. But the shades of the bus are pulled down. They do not have the slightest idea of what lies beyond the windows of the bus. And all the time of their journey is spent in squabbling over who will have the seat of honor in the bus, who will be applauded, who will be well considered. And so they remain till the journey’s end.

About the Author: Anthony De Mello was a Jesuit priest. Excerpt above from ‘The Way to Love‘, a compilation of final contemplations.

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The World Feeling And The Soul Feeling
How do you relate to the distinction between the worldly feeling and the soul feeling? Can you share an experience of a time you were able to see the distinction clearly? What helps you avoid getting addicted to worldly feelings?
Jagdish P Dave wrote: I like the way Anthony De Mello shows the contrast between WorldlyFeeling and Soul Feeling. Soul feeling arises from within us. is characterizedby joy, intimacy, nourishment, and fulfillment. No body …
David Doane wrote: What makes a feeling a soul feeling or a worldly feeling isn’t whether or not a person gets praise or applause or whether or not a person succeeds or wins, or whether or not a person has power. Wh…
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Some Good News

• What Makes A Good Life?
• Wholeness, Timelessness & Unfolding Meaning
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Video of the Week

• What Makes a Good Life?

Kindness Stories

Global call with Vallabh Bhanshali!
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Comparative Suffering & Compassion

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September 27, 2021

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Comparative Suffering & Compassion

We cannot selectively numb emotions, when we numb the painful emotions, we also numb the positive emotions.

– Brene Brown –

Comparative Suffering & Compassion

Measuring one’s suffering against that experienced by others is not an unusual tendency. The disproportionate degree of loss we have witnessed over the past year has left many struggling to make sense of where they fit into the whos-got-it-worse-hierarchy. When the world as we know it is undergoing tremendous and tumultuous shifts, how do we frame our blue days and broken hearts? In this article, writer and therapist Emily Barr explores the concept of comparative suffering and its antidote: compassion. { read more }

Be The Change

If interested, practice Loving-kindness meditation for a little while every day. If you haven’t tried it before, this site can help you get started. { more }

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21-Day Challenge (+ New Gandhi Series!)

Incubator of compassionate action.

‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌ ‌

ServiceSpace
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21 Day Compassion Challenge.
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After our global prayer circle in May, a seed for a 21-day interfaith compassion challenge emerged. Now, community members from 21 different faiths (including atheism) have come together to offer a daily prompt of unique practices of compassion. With compelling guest speakers, from the pioneering founder of URI Bishop William Swing to a group of Tibetan monks from Dalai Lama’s monastery in India(!) leading a collective chant, participants from 24 countries are readying for a sacred journey starting Oct 2nd. If you’d like to join, there’s still a few days left to join.
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gandhi_walk.png Commemorating Gandhi’s birthday, volunteers in India are launching a special “Law of Love” webinar series throughout the month. Building on the metaphor of “five fingers” of community, education, business, nonprofit and leadership sectors, we hope to explore nuances that draw a throughline from inner transformation to external impact. It starts with a very successful entrepreneur Vallabh Bhansali, who sits on the board of Mumbai’s stock exchange; Jayanti Ravi, who headed the education department of Gujarat and now leads Auroville; celebrity author Gary Zukav whose most recent book is titled Universal Human; Rani Bang, whose medical service in one of the most of poverty-stricken areas on the planet has become a global model, and Jerry White, a Nobel Peace Laureate! Following that series, all attendees will be invited to a “Gandhi Pod” to build on the dialogue in a peer-learning context. Do join us and share with your friends!
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TIDBITS FROM THE FIELD
group2.jpg Over the last few weeks, hundreds of you have joined and co-created wide-ranging pods from Education to Business to Living and Dying. The most recent “Laddership Pod“, requiring an intense 20 hours a week for an entire month, irrevocably touched its alumni and volunteers alike. In between, we hosted various “Pod Rooms” to deeply listen to each other’s stories; here’s a sampling of four videos:

  • Wounded Healers: lifelong advocate for racial and housing equity, youngest chaplain in Ivy League history, and author of six books, Chaz Howard tells stories that remake our idea of how change happens. #tears
  • Always Room for One More. For decades, Sister Lucy has been immersed in unconscionable suffering, and yet she radiates love and oozes joy. It is easy to see why even Pope Francis asked her for blessings. #bows
  • What the Whales Taught Me. Out in Alaska, almost out of nowhere, 40 whales surrounded her boat. They had come to teach her something. For the first time, Shay Beider shares four lessons whales can offer humans. #goosebumps
  • When I Met the Dalai Lama: In 2008, a freak accident on the Golden Gate Bridge left her with 17 broken bones, 9 surgeries and 7 weeks in coma. In one of our “Pod Rooms”, Grace Dammann shared a story that buoyed our spirits. #grace

group1.jpg Emergence never ceases to amaze. To encourage a podmate, Shaheen posted a link about a song by a Gandhian elder that her brother had recorded years ago; on another post, Ryan wrote about he had been wronged recently; to support him, in Vietnam, Linh picked up her guitar and spontaneously played an unforgettable rendition of that song: Game, Game, Game

That elder, Kanti-Dada, was a remarkable sculptor whose statue of Gandhi stands in Union Square in New York even today. He had one peculiar practice — he never signed his name on any of his art. To the question, “How do you know when a piece is complete?” he humbly replies, “When I know that I haven’t done it.”

Thank you for co-creating a field of sacred service.

ServiceSpace is a unique incubator of volunteer-run projects that nurture a culture of generosity. We believe that small acts of service can nurture a profound inner transformation that sustains external impact. To get involved, you can subscribe to our newsletters or create an account and complete our 3-step process to volunteer.
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Place, Personhood & the Hippocampus

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DailyGood News That Inspires

September 26, 2021

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Place, Personhood & the Hippocampus

Navigating becomes a way of knowing, familiarity, and fondness. It is how you can fall in love with a mountain or a forest.

– M.R. O’Connor –

Place, Personhood & the Hippocampus

“‘Place and a mind may interpenetrate till the nature of both is altered,’ the Scottish mountaineer and poet Nan Shepherd wrote in her lyrical love letter to her native Highlands, echoing an ancient intuition about how our formative physical landscapes shape our landscapes of thought and feeling. The word ‘genius’ in the modern sense, after all, originates in the Latin phrase genius loci — ‘the spirit of a place.'” In this post, Maria Popova delves into the themes of M.R. O’Connor’s book, “Wayfinding: The Science and Mystery of How Humans Navigate the World.” { read more }

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GPS gives directions — but what does it take away? This excerpt from O’Connor’s book shares more. { more }

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A Case for the Porch

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DailyGood News That Inspires

September 25, 2021

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A Case for the Porch

The extraordinary is waiting quietly beneath the skin of all that is ordinary.

– Mark Nepo –

A Case for the Porch

“Lately I’ve been trying to think like a porch. Trying to think between the natural and the human. Thinking how best to build during a climate crisis. I came across John Cage saying that progress in art “may be listening to nature.” He thought this activity could best play out on a porch, where we can hear nature’s symphony and then breathe our own masterpieces. Can we play our porches like instruments? So that we listen to but also learn from nature?” Charles Hailey shares more. { read more }

Be The Change

Why read in the Anthropocene? This essayist draws on Hailey’s book, “The Porch: Meditations on the Edge of Nature,” to help answer that question. Read the essay here. { more }

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What Makes A Good Life?

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DailyGood News That Inspires

September 24, 2021

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What Makes A Good Life?

There isn’t time — so brief is life — for bickerings, apologies, heartburnings, callings to account. There is only time for loving — and but an instant, so to speak, for that.

– Mark Twain –

What Makes A Good Life?

What keeps us happy and healthy as we go through life? If you think it’s fame and money, you’re not alone but, according to psychiatrist Robert Waldinger, you’re mistaken. As the director of a 75-year-old study on adult development, he shares three important lessons learned from the study as well as some practical, old-as-the-hills wisdom on how to build a fulfilling, long life. { read more }

Be The Change

The Harvard Study of Adult Development tracked 724 men for 75 years. The 60 who are still alive show proof of what can bring us true happiness and satisfaction. Guess at their three major findings before you watch! { more }

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