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Archive for March, 2021

Picture a Face

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DailyGood News That Inspires

March 31, 2021

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Picture a Face

We are one, after all, you and I, together we suffer, together exist and forever will recreate one another.

– Pierre Teilhard de Chardin –

Picture a Face

“Your phone rings in the middle of the night. As you reach blindly to answer, do you fear that someone you love has been in an accident? Has suddenly died? For a time, early in my marriage to Jihong, such calls would often wake us. The phone was on Jihong’s side of the bed. He’d lift the receiver to his ear and mumble a dazed hello. “Go back to Japan!” a loud male voice would yell, or something worse. Jihong would hang up. We nestled in each other’s arms. You’re paying a sad price for living ‘in freedom,’ I said to him, in my mind.” Phyllis Cole-Dai shares more in this poignant and timely piece. { read more }

Be The Change

Is there a practice that you engage in as an antidote to the energies of hatred and division in our world? If you feel called to, try out the practice Phyllis shares at the end of her piece.

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Our Nervous Systems in the Time of COVID

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DailyGood News That Inspires

March 30, 2021

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Our Nervous Systems in the Time of COVID

The muscles used to make a smile actually send a biochemical message to our nervous system that it is safe to relax the flight or freeze response.

– Tara Brach –

Our Nervous Systems in the Time of COVID

“The light at the end of the COVID tunnel is tenuously appearing yet many of us feel as exhausted as at any time in the past year. Memory problems; short fuses; fractured productivity; sudden drops into despair. Were at once excited and unnerved by the prospect of life opening up again. Clinical psychologist Christine Runyan explains the physiological effects of a year of pandemic and social isolation whats happened at the level of stress response and nervous system, the literal mind-body connection. And she offers simple strategies to regain our fullest capacities for the world ahead.” { read more }

Be The Change

If you find Runyan’s strategies useful, share them with friends and family whom you think might benefit.

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Awakin Weekly: Ambiguity Of Violence

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InnerNet Weekly: Inspirations from ServiceSpace.org
Ambiguity Of Violence
by Robert Sapolsky

[Listen to Audio!]

2407.jpgIt is the ambiguity of violence, that we can pull a trigger as an act of hideous aggression or of self-sacrificing love, that is so challenging. As a result, violence will always be a part of the human experience that is profoundly hard to understand. The biologies of strong love and strong hate are similar in many ways, which is we don’t actually hate aggression — we hate the wrong kind of aggression but love it in the right context.

My wife and I were in the minivan once, our kids in the back, my wife driving. And this completely reckless driver cuts us off, almost causing an accident, and in a way that makes it clear that it wasn’t distractedness on his part, just sheer selfishness.

My wife honks at him, and he flips us off. We’re livid, incensed. *****-where’s-the-cops-when-you-need-them, etc.

And suddenly my wife announces that we’re going to follow him, make him a little nervous. I’m still furious, but this doesn’t strike me as the most prudent thing in the world. Nonetheless, my wife starts trailing him, right on his rear.

After a few minutes the guy’s driving evasively, but my wife’s on him. Finally both cars stop at a red light, one that we know is a long one. Another car is stopped in front of the villain. He’s not going anywhere.

Suddenly my wife grabs something from the front seat divider, opens her door, and says, “Now he’s going to be sorry.”

I rouse myself feebly—“Uh, honey, do you really think this is such a goo—” But she’s out of the car, starts pounding on his window.

I hurry over just in time to hear my wife say, “If you could do something that mean to another person, you probably need this,” in a venomous voice. She then flings something in the window. She returns to the car triumphant, just glorious.

"What did you throw in there!?" She’s not talking yet. The light turns green, there’s no one behind us, and we just sit there.

The thug’s car starts to blink a very sensible turn indicator, makes a slow turn, and heads down a side street into the dark at, like, five miles an hour.

If it’s possible for a car to look ashamed, this car was doing it.

“Honey, what did you throw in there, tell me?”

She allows herself a small, malicious grin. “A grape lollipop.”

I was awed by her savage passive-aggressiveness —“You’re such a mean, awful human that something must have gone really wrong in your childhood, and maybe this lollipop will help correct that just a little.”

About the Author: Robert Sapolsky is a world-renowned neuroscientist, who has spent decades studying violence. This story is from the opening of his best-selling book ‘Behave‘.

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Latest Community Insights New!
Ambiguity Of Violence
How do you relate to the notion that the context of aggression matters? Can you share an experience that involved the ‘right’ kind of aggression? What helps you tinge even your aggressive moments with love?
Jagdish P Dave wrote: I tend to agree with the author Robert Sapolskythat aggression will always be a part of human experience. Love also will be a part of the human experience since the biologies of strong love and strong…
David Doane wrote: Aggression means hostile, violent, attacking. For me, the context of aggression doesn’t matter. Aggression meaning hostile or violent is always unnecessary and probably harmful. I don’t have a…
Liz Helgesen wrote: With Love Not Aggression

This piece made me feel very uncomfortable. I am uncertain the wife’s actions were wise, and seemed not non-violent to me. Especially that children were in the car watchi…

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Some Good News

• The World’s Last Nomadic Peoples
• Wish You Were Here: Postcards from the Future
• Poetry Calls Us To Pause

Video of the Week

• The Buy Nothing Project Gift Economies

Kindness Stories

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Join us for a conference call this Saturday, with a global group of ServiceSpace friends and our insightful guest speaker. Join the Forest Call >>

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Back in 1997, one person started sending this simple “meditation reminder” to a few friends. Soon after, “Wednesdays” started, ServiceSpace blossomed, and the humble experiments of service took a life of its own. If you’d like to start an Awakin gathering in your area, we’d be happy to help you get started.

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Wish You Were Here: Postcards from the Future

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DailyGood News That Inspires

March 29, 2021

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Wish You Were Here: Postcards from the Future

Real generosity towards the future lies in giving all to the present

– Albert Camus –

Wish You Were Here: Postcards from the Future

“We invited other artists–people who process the world through making–to create their own postcards in the face of the naked truths of climate change. We asked them to join us in a written and visual chorus to the young people dearest to us and to everyone on Earth, now and in the future. You can see what came out here: intimate and urgent messages written for loved ones and for people we will never know. Physical objects that may, themselves, become all that’s left of the world we know today. Wish You Were Here is a collection of postcards from beloved places to the people who will never know them.” { read more }

Be The Change

Consider the questions that the creators of this poignant project pose to people of this Earth, “What will you miss? Of what will you sing?”

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The World’s Last Nomadic Peoples

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DailyGood News That Inspires

March 28, 2021

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The World's Last Nomadic Peoples

A good traveller has no fixed plans and is not intent on arriving.

– Lao Tzu –

The World’s Last Nomadic Peoples

“From Jeroen Toirkens comes ‘Nomad’ — a fascinating and strikingly beautiful visual anthropology of the Northern Hemispheres last living nomadic peoples, from Greenland to Turkey. A decade in the making, this multi-continent journey unfolds in 150 black-and-white and full-color photos that reveal what feels like an alternate reality of a life often harsh, sometimes poetic, devoid of many of our modern luxuries and basic givens, from shiny digital gadgets to a permanent roof over one’s head.” View some of Toirken’s stunning photographs and read more here. { read more }

Be The Change

This Tuesday, join a special conversation with veteran nomad Chris Carrington, a woman whose 12 years on the road have given her stories, insights and a unique capacity to challenge the status quo. More details and RSVP info here. { more }

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Poetry Calls Us To Pause

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DailyGood News That Inspires

March 27, 2021

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Poetry Calls Us To Pause

Poetry calls us to pause. There is so much we overlook, while the abundance around us continues to shimmer, on its own.

– Naomi Shihab Nye –

Poetry Calls Us To Pause

“It is the simple topic, a commonality that I choose to explore, so when I walk down a street, open a can of soup, view a fading poster on the wall, or imagine what I might write in wet cement, I ask myself what am I noticing and what is my response in the moment.” Poet Elizabeth Brule Farrell shares more about her calling, and offers a selection of her wonderful poems here. { read more }

Be The Change

Do you pay attention to the shimmering abundance that surrounds you? Look around, and ask yourself in this moment, “What am I noticing?”

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The Buy Nothing Project Gift Economies

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DailyGood News That Inspires

March 26, 2021

a project of ServiceSpace

The Buy Nothing Project Gift Economies

As you simplify your life, the laws of the universe will be simpler; solitude will not be solitude, poverty will not be poverty, nor weakness weakness.

– Henry David Thoreau –

The Buy Nothing Project Gift Economies

Liesl Clark and her family traveled to Nepal on a “quest to find answers.” They returned home with a new perspective on community and a better way of living. Clark saw how the Nepalese cared for each other, insisting on sharing gifts equally within the community and taking responsibility for the aging, fragile, and infirm without regard to family ties. She believed these principles could be applied to their area and possibly beyond. With help from her friend Rebecca Rockefeller, Clark began The Buy Nothing Project with a Facebook page and a list of ideals. Their hope was to focus more on community and connections and less on stuff, thereby removing physical wealth from the equation. The project encourages the feeling that we are all connected and that everyone has something to offer. Some cook meals for others. Some collect food growing on trees and vines in public places, food that may often be left to rot. The movement, started from one collective on Bainbridge Island, Washington, now has more than 1.5 million members and counting. Watch this video to learn more of the backstory behind the local gift economies of this experimental social movement sweeping across the globe. { read more }

Be The Change

Visit 31 Ways to Build Community to learn about other ways to foster connections in your neighborhood. { more }

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The Buy Nothing Project Gift Economies

This week’s inspiring video: The Buy Nothing Project Gift Economies
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KarmaTube.org

Video of the Week

Mar 25, 2021
The Buy Nothing Project Gift Economies

The Buy Nothing Project Gift Economies

Liesl Clark and her family traveled to Nepal on a "quest to find answers." They returned home with a new perspective on community and a better way of living. Clark saw how the Nepalese cared for each other, insisting on sharing gifts equally within the community and taking responsibility for the aging, fragile, and infirm without regard to family ties. She believed these principles could be applied to their area and possibly beyond. With help from her friend Rebecca Rockefeller, Clark began The Buy Nothing Project with a Facebook page and a list of ideals. Their hope was to focus more on community and connections and less on stuff, thereby removing physical wealth from the equation. The project encourages the feeling that we are all connected and that everyone has something to offer. Some cook meals for others. Some collect food growing on trees and vines in public places, food that may often be left to rot. The movement, started from one collective on Bainbridge Island, Washington, now has more than 1.5 million members and counting. Watch this video to learn more of the backstory behind the local gift economies of this experimental social movement sweeping across the globe.
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Waiting for the Thaw

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DailyGood News That Inspires

March 25, 2021

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Waiting for the Thaw

Thaw with her gentle persuasion is more powerful than Thor with his hammer. The one melts, the other breaks into pieces.

– Henry David Thoreau –

Waiting for the Thaw

“It’s about this time in the long stretch of winter that I begin to ache for spring. By March, I tend become a bit dulled to the beauty of winter. Though my prayer and meditation keep my heart open to seeing the passage of time and seasons with appreciative eyes, mostly I just want the cold days to be over. As the earth begins to thaw, we often want the process to hurry up. I long for bright flowers blowing in a spring breeze and warm summer evenings on the porch. While impatience with winter is only human, I pause and remember the need to move slowly through this time of year.” What follows is a lovely meditation on waiting for the thaw, followed by three classic poems that capture aspects of this transitional time.” DailyGood writer, Virginia May Drotar, shares more in this lovely piece. { read more }

Be The Change

Virginia (aka Ginny) and Duane Drotar are the stewards and founders of Shadowbrook, a budding, transformative experiment in community-building, based in Ohio. Shadowbrook is meant for people of all means, and from all backgrounds, it is a space, “where silence and shadow work, mutual exchange and justice re-birthing, and whole person wellness and service, intersect.” Join an intimate circle with Virginia and Duane (today!) to hear more about their shared journey, aspirations and plans for Shadowbrook. To join, RSVP here. { more }

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Spotlight In Kindness: Sacred Reciprocity

When people are kind, they don’t want anything in return. It is simply an expression of their gratitude for being alive. Yet, what we put out has an uncanny way of returning back to us. Kindness comes back to replenish us, restore us, rejuvenate us — in ways we might never imagine. Not only that, kindness has no expiration date. I’d like to believe that no act of kindness ever goes unaccounted, and sooner or later, like a boomerang, always finds its way back to the giver. This week’s stories share the sacred reciprocity of kindness. –Guri

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“Kindness can become its own motive. We are made kind by being kind.” –Eric Hoffer
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Editor’s Note: When people are kind, they don’t want anything in return. It is simply an expression of their gratitude for being alive. Yet, what we put out has an uncanny way of returning back to us. Kindness comes back to replenish us, restore us, rejuvenate us — in ways we might never imagine. Not only that, kindness has no expiration date. I’d like to believe that no act of kindness ever goes unaccounted, and sooner or later, like a boomerang, always finds its way back to the giver. This week’s stories share the sacred reciprocity of kindness. –Guri
Kindness Rocks
Kindness In the News
Kindness towards her students comes back to the teacher from a cashier at the dollar store; which then ricochets back to the cashier from the teacher’s community. Here’s a story of kindness ripples.
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Kindness is Contagious.
From Our Members
When money was tight, she recalls counting her pennies and putting back a frozen meal at the grocery store that she really wanted. Except that only hours later she opened her door to find a package.
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Inspiring Video of the Week
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Play
A Viewer’s Story
Hugs A kindness act returns to a woman years later in this short, Pay it Forward segment that recently launched.
In Giving, We Receive
In other news …
One mom witnessed a precious exchange between her young sons. Noah, a 6-year-old, calms his little brother with a deep breathing exercise in this viral video clip. A beautiful reminder that children are always learning, and sharing what they’ve learned with others.
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