In association with hhdlstudycirclemontreal.org

Archive for August, 2020

Revisiting Fred Rogers 2002 Commencement Address

You’re receiving this email because you are a DailyGood subscriber.
Trouble Viewing? On a mobile? Just click here. Not interested anymore? Unsubscribe.
DailyGood News That Inspires

August 31, 2020

a project of ServiceSpace

Revisiting Fred Rogers 2002 Commencement Address

Our world hangs like a magnificent jewel in the vastness of space. Every one of us is a part of that jewel.

– Fred Rogers –

Revisiting Fred Rogers 2002 Commencement Address

“I’m very much interested in choices, and what it is, and who it is, that enable us human beings to make the choices we make all through our lives. What choices lead to ethnic cleansing? What choices lead to healing? What choices lead to the destruction of the environment, the erosion of the Sabbath, suicide bombings, or teenagers shooting teachers. What choices encourage heroism in the midst of chaos?” In 2002 Fred Rogers gave the commencement address at Dartmouth University. His words and questions are more relevant than ever in today’s world. { read more }

Be The Change

Who are the mentors and elders in your life whose words of inspiration have made you feel “part of the jewel” of this Earth”? How can you share that gift with someone else today?

COMMENT | RATE Email Twitter FaceBook

Related Good News

Smile Big
Love Freely
Meditate
Give Back

111 Trees

This is Me at 68: Elders Reflect During Crisis

How to Be Yourself

How to Strengthen Your Inner Shield

Smile Big
Love Freely
Meditate
Give Back

A Tribute to Mary Oliver

The Monkey and the River

A Pandemic Poem-Prayer

Erich Fromm’s Six Rules of Listening

DailyGood is a volunteer-run initiative that delivers “good news” to 246,847 subscribers. There are many ways to help. To unsubscribe, click here.

Other ServiceSpace projects include:

KindSpring // KarmaTube // Conversations // Awakin // More

A Pandemic Letter to My 17-Year-Old Son

You’re receiving this email because you are a DailyGood subscriber.
Trouble Viewing? On a mobile? Just click here. Not interested anymore? Unsubscribe.
DailyGood News That Inspires

August 30, 2020

a project of ServiceSpace

A Pandemic Letter to My 17-Year-Old Son

Have a heart that never hardens, and a temper that never tires, and a touch that never hurts.

– Charles Dickens –

A Pandemic Letter to My 17-Year-Old Son

“Starting when you were just a toddler, you’d crawl into my lap to play a game. I’d lay hands on each part of your body, naming it aloud. Wed begin with the grass of hair on your head and slowly work our way down to your piggy toes. You soon learned even the regions of your brain, the organs in your torso, and your seven chakras.” So begins a touching letter written by a mother to her 17-year-old son in the midst of these uncertain times. { read more }

Be The Change

Write a letter to a loved one today.

COMMENT | RATE Email Twitter FaceBook

Related Good News

Smile Big
Love Freely
Meditate
Give Back

Children, Anger Control and Inuit Wisdom

How to Be Yourself

I Wish My Teacher Knew…

Mary Oliver: Instructions for Living A Life

Smile Big
Love Freely
Meditate
Give Back

5 Core Practices for More Meaningful Conversations

12 Truths I Learned from Life and Writing

The Monkey and the River

The Understory: Life Beneath the Forest Floor

DailyGood is a volunteer-run initiative that delivers “good news” to 246,859 subscribers. There are many ways to help. To unsubscribe, click here.

Other ServiceSpace projects include:

KindSpring // KarmaTube // Conversations // Awakin // More

Beyond Words: A Conversation with Carl Safina

You’re receiving this email because you are a DailyGood subscriber.
Trouble Viewing? On a mobile? Just click here. Not interested anymore? Unsubscribe.
DailyGood News That Inspires

August 29, 2020

a project of ServiceSpace

Beyond Words: A Conversation with Carl Safina

Our relationship to most living things is, and must be I think, a moral one not a practical one.

– Carl Safina –

Beyond Words: A Conversation with Carl Safina

“Safina’s journey in ecology and conservation took him through his PhD and then back to the obvious. I learned this is called anthropomorphizing and you’re not supposed to do that. The orthodox view is that other animals don’t have human thoughts or emotions. I learned all of that and then realized that what I knew when I was seven was actually more accurate.” More in this interview with Safina.

{ read more }

Be The Change

Don’t let the enormity of all the facets of the environmental problem stop you. We can always do something. We can think about what well eat, who we will vote for, what we will buy, what groups we will support or join, what we will talk about, who we want to be in the world and the list can go on.

COMMENT | RATE Email Twitter FaceBook

Related Good News

Smile Big
Love Freely
Meditate
Give Back

Guide to Well-Being During Coronavirus

How to Be Yourself

Why Singing in a Choir Makes You Happier

On Being Alone

Smile Big
Love Freely
Meditate
Give Back

A Tribute to Mary Oliver

Love in the Time of Coronavirus

Three Methods for Working with Chaos

A Pandemic Poem-Prayer

DailyGood is a volunteer-run initiative that delivers “good news” to 246,877 subscribers. There are many ways to help. To unsubscribe, click here.

Other ServiceSpace projects include:

KindSpring // KarmaTube // Conversations // Awakin // More

Lucky Man: Life Lessons from William Segal

You’re receiving this email because you are a DailyGood subscriber.
Trouble Viewing? On a mobile? Just click here. Not interested anymore? Unsubscribe.
DailyGood News That Inspires

August 28, 2020

a project of ServiceSpace

Lucky Man: Life Lessons from William Segal

Happiness is not a matter of intensity but of balance and order and rhythm and harmony.

– Thomas Merton –

Lucky Man: Life Lessons from William Segal

“How can we find balance and peace in the midst of pain and turmoil? A legendary Zen Buddhist master once sent this startling note to a friend: “Lucky man,” wrote Soen Nakagawa Roshi, the abbot of Ryutakuji monastery in Japan. “One accident like yours is worth ten thousand sittings in a monastery!” The accident the Zen master mentioned was a devastating car crash. The “lucky man” was William Segal, 67, a magazine publisher, artist, and spiritual seeker. Segal received the message as he lay in a hospital bed in New York. Both hips were shattered, his skull was fractured; and all the bones in his face were broken.” More about William Segal’s life and spirit in this thoughtful piece. { read more }

Be The Change

What is your framing of happiness and misfortune? Do you find this framing fosters your transformation, or keeps you stuck in certain patterns?

COMMENT | RATE Email Twitter FaceBook

Related Good News

Smile Big
Love Freely
Meditate
Give Back

111 Trees

Guide to Well-Being During Coronavirus

Being Resilient During Coronavirus

Children, Anger Control and Inuit Wisdom

Smile Big
Love Freely
Meditate
Give Back

How to Strengthen Your Inner Shield

On Being Alone

One Love

A Pandemic Poem-Prayer

DailyGood is a volunteer-run initiative that delivers “good news” to 246,883 subscribers. There are many ways to help. To unsubscribe, click here.

Other ServiceSpace projects include:

KindSpring // KarmaTube // Conversations // Awakin // More

The Wayfinders – Why Ancient Wisdom Matters in a Modern World

This week’s inspiring video: The Wayfinders – Why Ancient Wisdom Matters in a Modern World
Having trouble reading this mail? View it in your browser. Not interested anymore? Unsubscribe
KarmaTube.org

Video of the Week

Aug 27, 2020
The Wayfinders - Why Ancient Wisdom Matters in a Modern World

The Wayfinders – Why Ancient Wisdom Matters in a Modern World

Wade Davis, anthropologist and passionate scholar of indigenous cultures that span the globe, shares the value of learning from these dynamic, living societies, as we face the challenges threatening the earth. He takes us on a journey to "the heart of the world" and asks the question, "What does it actually mean for a people to believe that the earth is resonant and alive and responsive to their desires and that they themselves have a reciprocal obligation to that landscape?"
Watch Video Now Share: Email Twitter FaceBook

Related KarmaTube Videos

Smile Big
Meditate
Live It Up
Serve All

I Will Be a Hummingbird

Aurora Borealis

They Call Me Birdman

Julia Butterfly Hill on ‘Disposability Consciousness’

About KarmaTube:
KarmaTube is a collection of inspiring videos accompanied by simple actions every viewer can take. We invite you to get involved.
Other ServiceSpace Projects:

DailyGood // Conversations // iJourney // HelpOthers

MovedByLove // CF Sites // Karma Kitchen // More

Thank you for helping us spread the good. This newsletter now reaches 69,401 subscribers.

The Beauty in Breaking

You’re receiving this email because you are a DailyGood subscriber.
Trouble Viewing? On a mobile? Just click here. Not interested anymore? Unsubscribe.
DailyGood News That Inspires

August 27, 2020

a project of ServiceSpace

The Beauty in Breaking

God breaks the heart again and again and again until it stays open.

– Michele Harper –

The Beauty in Breaking

Michele Harper is a female, African American emergency room physician in a profession that is predominantly male and white. In her new book, “The Beauty in Breaking,” she explores the themes of race, gender, injustice and hope — and in doing so shares the story of how her own healing emerged through a life lived in service of others. Read an excerpt from the book here. { read more }

Be The Change

Kintsugi is an art born out of brokenness. Read more about it in this beautiful piece: The Golden Joinery of Love. { more }

COMMENT | RATE Email Twitter FaceBook

Related Good News

Smile Big
Love Freely
Meditate
Give Back

How to Be Yourself

Why Singing in a Choir Makes You Happier

The Joy of Being a Woman in Her Seventies

16 Teachings from COVID-19

Smile Big
Love Freely
Meditate
Give Back

Love in the Time of Coronavirus

The Monkey and the River

Three Methods for Working with Chaos

The Understory: Life Beneath the Forest Floor

DailyGood is a volunteer-run initiative that delivers “good news” to 246,889 subscribers. There are many ways to help. To unsubscribe, click here.

Other ServiceSpace projects include:

KindSpring // KarmaTube // Conversations // Awakin // More

The Wayfinders: Why Ancient Wisdom Matters in the Modern World

You’re receiving this email because you are a DailyGood subscriber.
Trouble Viewing? On a mobile? Just click here. Not interested anymore? Unsubscribe.
DailyGood News That Inspires

August 26, 2020

a project of ServiceSpace

The Wayfinders: Why Ancient Wisdom Matters in the Modern World

What is even more astonishing is that the entire science of wayfinding is based on dead reckoning. You only know where you are by knowing precisely where you have been and how you got to where you are.

– Wade Davis –

The Wayfinders: Why Ancient Wisdom Matters in the Modern World

Wade Davis, anthropologist and passionate scholar of indigenous cultures that span the globe, shares the value of learning from these dynamic, living societies, as we face the challenges threatening the earth. He takes us on a journey to “the heart of the world” and asks the question, “What does it actually mean for a people to believe that the earth is resonant and alive and responsive to their desires and that they themselves have a reciprocal obligation to that landscape?” { read more }

Be The Change

How can you re-imagine your part in the human story as beyond business as usual?

COMMENT | RATE Email Twitter FaceBook

Related Good News

Smile Big
Love Freely
Meditate
Give Back

How to Be Yourself

I Wish My Teacher Knew…

Why Singing in a Choir Makes You Happier

How to Strengthen Your Inner Shield

Smile Big
Love Freely
Meditate
Give Back

On Being Alone

16 Teachings from COVID-19

Orion’s 25 Most-Read Articles of the Decade

One Love

DailyGood is a volunteer-run initiative that delivers “good news” to 246,907 subscribers. There are many ways to help. To unsubscribe, click here.

Other ServiceSpace projects include:

KindSpring // KarmaTube // Conversations // Awakin // More

Spotlight On Kindness: “Scorched, But Still Standing”

California wildfires impacted over a million acres this week. Though feared destroyed, most of the ancient redwoods at the oldest state park withstood the blaze. Among the survivors is a 2,000-year-old tree known as the “Mother of the Forest.” One newspaper headline read, “Scorched, But Still Standing.” Even during their hardship, these elders seem to be teaching us about resiliency? –Guri

View In Browser
Weekly KindSpring Newsletter
Home | Contact
Spotlight On
Kindness
A Weekly Offering
Love
“It’s your reaction to adversity, not adversity itself that determines how your life’s story will develop.” –Dieter F. Uchtdorf
Smile
Editor’s Note: California wildfires impacted over a million acres this week. Though feared destroyed, most of the ancient redwoods at the oldest state park withstood the blaze. Among the survivors is a 2,000-year-old tree known as the “Mother of the Forest.” One newspaper headline read, “Scorched, But Still Standing.” Even during their hardship, these elders seem to be teaching us about resiliency? –Guri
Kindness Rocks
Kindness In the News
NBC News reports shares more on Big Basin Redwood State. “When forest fires, windstorms and lightning hit redwood trees, those that don’t topple can resprout. The forest is not gone. It will regrow.”
Read More
Kindness is Contagious.
From Our Members
From the giant redwoods to this little ten-year-old — in a small act of kindness towards a complete stranger, this young girl reveals her gigantic heart.
Read More
Inspiring Video of the Week
Serve all
Play
What Trauma Taught Me About Resilience
Hugs In this profoundly moving TEDx talk, Charles Hunt talks about growing up against all odds. And realizing that resilience can be learned, and is critical to happiness and success.
In Giving, We Receive
In other news …
“Why do some people bounce back from adversity and misfortune? Why do others fall apart? Find out which character strengths make all the difference — and how you can develop them yourself.” The 5 Best Ways to Build Resiliency
FB Twitter
KindSpring is a 100% volunteer-run platform that allows everyday people around the world to connect and deepen in the spirit of kindness. Current subscribers: 146,562

Having trouble reading this? View it in your browser. Not interested anymore? Unsubscribe.

Beyond Hope: Letting Go of a World in Collapse

You’re receiving this email because you are a DailyGood subscriber.
Trouble Viewing? On a mobile? Just click here. Not interested anymore? Unsubscribe.
DailyGood News That Inspires

August 25, 2020

a project of ServiceSpace

Beyond Hope: Letting Go of a World in Collapse

If you’re right and you know it, speak your mind. Speak your mind. Even if you are a minority of one, the truth is still the truth.

– Mahatma Gandhi –

Beyond Hope: Letting Go of a World in Collapse

“The rapid acceleration of violent events around the globe: the uprising of religious fundamentalism, xenophobia, homophobia, speciesism, misogyny, societal breakdown, mass animal die-offs, the unparalleled disintegration of the cryosphere, and the rapid decay of our very biosphere; it all weighs heavy on my mind and heart. There is no denying that we are living through what scientists are calling, the 6th Great Extinction Event. These are indeed unprecedented times.[…] The bottom line is that I don’t write for comfort. I don’t write to make friends. I don’t write to preserve the status quo. I write to rattle cages until the locks fall off. I write to demolish old paradigms. I write to give voice to the voiceless: animals, Earth, and the Soul. I write to make hearts bleed with grief, and heal from Self reclamation. I write to shock, anger, irritate, and destroy the ignorance of antiquated belief systems. I write to bring light to the critical conversations that are swept under the rug and spotlight the cracks in our consciousness that have separated us from life.”More in this excerpt from Deb Ozarko’s book, ‘Beyond Hope.’ { read more }

Be The Change

For more inspiration, join a special call this week with Deb Ozarko. More details and RSVP info here.

{ more }

COMMENT | RATE Email Twitter FaceBook

Related Good News

Smile Big
Love Freely
Meditate
Give Back

Children, Anger Control and Inuit Wisdom

I Wish My Teacher Knew…

The Joy of Being a Woman in Her Seventies

Orion’s 25 Most-Read Articles of the Decade

Smile Big
Love Freely
Meditate
Give Back

12 Truths I Learned from Life and Writing

Love in the Time of Coronavirus

Three Methods for Working with Chaos

A Pandemic Poem-Prayer

DailyGood is a volunteer-run initiative that delivers “good news” to 246,916 subscribers. There are many ways to help. To unsubscribe, click here.

Other ServiceSpace projects include:

KindSpring // KarmaTube // Conversations // Awakin // More

Awakin Weekly: The Wisdom Of Uncertainty

Email not displaying correctly? View it in your browser.
InnerNet Weekly: Inspirations from ServiceSpace.org
The Wisdom Of Uncertainty
by Jack Kornfield

[Listen to Audio!]

tow3.jpgOne day Ajahn Chah held up a beautiful Chinese tea cup, “To me this cup is already broken. Because I know its fate, I can enjoy it fully here and now. And when it’s gone, it’s gone.” When we understand the truth of uncertainty and relax, we become free.

The broken cup helps us see beyond our illusion of control. When we commit ourselves to raising a child, building a business, creating a work of art, or righting an injustice, some measure of failure as well as success will be ours. This is a fierce teaching. Margaret is an aid worker whose clinic in Kosovo was burned to the ground, yet she began again. She knows that her work is helping people through success and failure. Emilee, who lost her most promising math student to a gang shooting, was broken-hearted. But she doesn’t regret having tutored him and now she is tutoring several others in his honor.

We may lose our best piece of pottery in the firing, the charter school we work so hard to create may fold, our start up business may go under, our children may develop problems beyond our control. If we only focus on the results, we will be devastated. But if we know the cup is broken, we can give our best to the process, create what we can and trust the larger process of life itself. We can plan, we can care for, tend and respond. But we cannot control. Instead we take a breath, and open to what is unfolding, where we are. This is a profound shift, from holding on, to letting go. As Suzuki Roshi says, “When we understand the truth of impermanence and find our composure in it, there we find ourselves in Nirvana.”

When people asked Ajahn Chah questions about enlightenment or what happens at death or whether meditation would heal their illness, or whether Buddhist teachings could be practiced equally by westerners, he would smile and say “It’s uncertain, isn’t it?” Chögyam Trungpa called this uncertainty “groundlessness.” With the wisdom of uncertainty, Ajahn Chah could simply relax. Around him was an enormous sense of ease. He didn’t hold his breath or try to manipulate events. He responded to the situation at hand. When a senior western nun left the Buddhist order to become a born again Christian missionary, and then returned to the monastery to try to convert her old friends, many were upset. “How could she do this?” Confused, they asked Ajahn Chah about her. He responded with a laugh, “Maybe she’s right.” With these words, everyone relaxed. When called for, Ajahn Chah could plan the construction of a great temple or oversee the network of over 100 monasteries started by his monks. When disciplining misbehaving monks, he could be decisive, demanding and stern. But there was a spaciousness around all these actions, as if he could turn to you a moment later and smile – like a wink – and say, “It’s uncertain, isn’t it?” He was living proof of the secret of life described in the Bhagavad Gita, “to act well without attachment to the fruits of your actions.”

The trust expressed by Ajahn Chah comes whenever our consciousness rests in the eternal present. “From where I sit,” he said, “nobody comes and no one goes.” “In the middle way, there is no one who is strong or weak, young or old, no one who is born and no one who dies. This is the unconditioned. The heart is free.” The ancient Zen masters call this enlightenment “the trusting mind.” The Zen texts explain how to do so, “To live in Trusting Mind is to be without anxiety about non-perfection.” The world is ‘imperfect.’ Instead of struggling to perfect the world, we relax, we rest in the uncertainty. Then we can act with compassion and we give our best. Without attachment to the outcome, we bring fearlessness and trust to any circumstances.

About the Author: Jack Kornfield is the meditation teacher, and author of various books. Excerpt above is from his book, The Wise Heart.

Share the Wisdom:
Email Twitter FaceBook
Latest Community Insights New!
The Wisdom Of Uncertainty
What does the ‘wisdom of uncertainty’ mean to you? Can you share a personal story of a time you were able to lean into the wisdom of uncertainty and accept non-perfection? What helps you live in the ‘Trusting Mind’?
Jagdish P Dave wrote: Knowing and accepting tha fact that the cup of my life is going to be broken one day and not to get hung up or chained by the fear of uncertainty is the way of living fully. This is my understanding o…
David Doane wrote: The wisdom of uncertainty is that there is no certainty. That is a basic fact of life and to accept it is to avoid a lot of grief. I always have some amount of awareness of uncertainty which helps me …
Share/Read Your Reflections
Awakin Circles:
Many years ago, a couple friends got together to sit in silence for an hour, and share personal aha-moments. That birthed this newsletter, and rippled out as Awakin Circles in 80+ living rooms around the globe. To join in Santa Clara this week, RSVP online.

RSVP For Wednesday

Some Good News

The Phone Call
A Man Impossible to Classify
BLM: Four Lessons in White Allyship from South Africa

Video of the Week

The Phone Call

Kindness Stories

Global call with Deb Ozarko!
507.jpgJoin us for a conference call this Saturday, with a global group of ServiceSpace friends and our insightful guest speaker. Join the Forest Call >>

About
Back in 1997, one person started sending this simple “meditation reminder” to a few friends. Soon after, “Wednesdays” started, ServiceSpace blossomed, and the humble experiments of service took a life of its own. If you’d like to start an Awakin gathering in your area, we’d be happy to help you get started.

Forward to a Friend

Awakin Weekly delivers weekly inspiration to its 94,166 subscribers. We never spam or host any advertising. And you can unsubscribe anytime, within seconds.

On our website, you can view 17+ year archive of these readings. For broader context, visit our umbrella organization: ServiceSpace.org.