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Archive for April, 2020

How the Jump Rope Got Its Rhythm

This week’s inspiring video: How the Jump Rope Got Its Rhythm
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Video of the Week

Apr 30, 2020
How the Jump Rope Got Its Rhythm

How the Jump Rope Got Its Rhythm

The jump rope may be a simple object but for countless generations it has served as a powerful symbol of culture and identity for African American girls and women. The skipping rope is a steady timeline upon which girls add rhymes, rhythms and chants, creating a space that is uniquely their own. It is a word of mouth and word of body treasure passed down from one generation to the next, with influences on hip hop and other music that span the globe.
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Helping Parents When Parenting Gets Hard

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DailyGood News That Inspires

April 30, 2020

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Helping Parents When Parenting Gets Hard

Listening connects us and heals the hurt we carry–we can make a world of difference for one another by listening.

– Patty Wipfler –

Helping Parents When Parenting Gets Hard

“I love the act of listening to parents, one-on-one or in a group. Parents have so much love they want to give to their children and families, they work so hard at it, they summon unprecedented amounts of energy and persistence to love well. I love listening over time, and being privy to the creativity of parents, and to their successes in transforming difficult situations in their families into progress for their children and for themselves.” Patty Wipfler is the founder and Program Director of Hand in Hand Parenting, a non-profit, parent-led organization that helps parents when parenting gets hard. Over the past 45 years her work has focused on building parents’ emotional understanding and on helping them to establish networks of mutual support. Learn more about her fascinating journey here. { read more }

Be The Change

Join this Saturday’s Awakin Call with Patty Wipler, and forward this invitation to other parents you know who might benefit from her insights. RSVP here. { more }

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Where Fear Meets Hope: Stories from Around the Globe

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DailyGood News That Inspires

April 29, 2020

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Where Fear Meets Hope: Stories from Around the Globe

I said to my soul, be still and wait without hope, for hope would be hope for the wrong thing; wait without love, for love would be love of the wrong thing; there is yet faith, but the faith and the love are all in the waiting. Wait without thought, for you are not ready for thought: So the darkness shall be the light, and the stillness the dancing.

– T.S. Eliot –

Where Fear Meets Hope: Stories from Around the Globe

As we grow accustomed to life under lockdown, we are discovering the richness that can emerge from the quiet, contemplative nature of solitude. Hoping to tap into the inner wisdom of our collective attempt to find light amidst darkness, writer Emily Rose Barr asked one simple question of individuals across the globe: What are you doing that’s bringing a little extra joy, light, or laughter to your days? As the answers poured in, she realized that perhaps the paradoxes of our time — hope and fear, connection and isolation, anger and compassion — are not meant to be reconciled, but simply to be lived. Read more to learn how the discomfort of uncertainty invites us to take care of ourselves with renewed deliberation and embrace the mysteries that call us into stillness. { read more }

Be The Change

As you go about your week, tune into the paradoxes that surround you. When you feel afraid or sad, be mindful of what these moments might be trying to teach you. When you feel joyful or relaxed, let yourself sink into your body and appreciate its steady companionship. Be gentle with yourself and those around you as we ride this tremendous wave of uncertainty.

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Spotlight On Kindness: SUPERHERO

Regardless of their size, age, color, or whether they wear a cape, we can all agree that a Superhero is someone who uses their power to do good in the world. In these unprecedented times, people are making extraordinarily heroic efforts to help others. The stories below and the music video celebrate these heroes. On this National Superhero Day, take time today to reflect on your heroes. –Guri

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Editor’s Note: Regardless of their size, age, color, or whether they wear a cape, we can all agree that a Superhero is someone who uses their power to do good in the world. In these unprecedented times, people are making extraordinarily heroic efforts to help others. The stories below and the music video celebrate these heroes. On this National Superhero Day, take time today to reflect on your heroes. –Guri
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For 28 days, more than 40 employees at a Pennsylvania company unanimously decided to literally live at their production plant — eating and sleeping there — to make equipment for health care workers.
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Hugs A music video that is an anthem for our times; “Superhero” is an ode to every person in our lives who reminds us that we can all do something and that together we are stronger.
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In this beautifully illustrated compilation, citizens 60 and older share their experiences and reflections related to the COVID-19 global pandemic from becoming a grandmother to dancing in the street.
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Following Butterflies: A Conversation with Milan Rai

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DailyGood News That Inspires

April 28, 2020

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Following Butterflies: A Conversation with Milan Rai

Intellect has its own use; make the most out of it. But when it’s time to make a decision, listen to your heart. That’s what I do.

– Milan Rai –

Following Butterflies: A Conversation with Milan Rai

Milan Rai is a self-taught Nepalese contemporary visual artist. A self-described failure in school, he now sees the world as his studio. A moment of serendipity set him on his path. Inspired by a butterfly that alighted on his paintbrush in the middle of a challenging project in 2013, Rai began cutting out simple white butterfly shapes from paper and thoughtfully arranging and affixing them to surfaces in his hometown of Kathmandu — including on trees, bridge pillars, walls, and dilapidated buildings. His signature work, the White Butterfly, started as a simple project in his studio and has evolved into a powerful symbol of global expression, inviting change and interaction in more than 40 different countries across the globe. He shares more from his stunning journey in this interview. { read more }

Be The Change

Take a little time to think back. What things did you love doing when you were a child. Have you overlooked these things in your life? Carve out time to return to them now, even if in a very small way. For more inspiration check out “Portrait of an Artist”, a short video interview with Rai. { more }

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Awakin Weekly: Opposite Of Meditation Is Not Action, It’s Reaction

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InnerNet Weekly: Inspirations from ServiceSpace.org
Opposite Of Meditation Is Not Action, It’s Reaction
by Richard Rohr

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2402.jpgIt seems like our society is at a low point in terms of how we talk about challenging, controversial topics within our political discourse and even our spiritual reflections. I believe the only way through this polarization is a re-appreciation for silence.

Silence has a life of its own. It is not just that which is around words and underneath images and events. It is a being in itself to which we can relate and become intimately familiar. Philosophically, we would say being is that foundational quality which precedes all other attributes. Silence is at the very foundation of all reality—naked being, if you will. Pure being is that out of which all else comes and to which all things return. Or as I like to say, Reality is the closest ally of God.

When we connect with silence as a living, primordial presence, we can then see all other things—and experience them deeply—inside that container. Silence is not just an absence, but a primal presence. Silence surrounds every “I know” with a humble and patient “I don’t know.” It protects the autonomy and dignity of events, persons, animals, and all created things.

To be clear, the kind of silence I’m describing does not ignore injustice. As Barbara Holmes explains: "Some of us allow [silence] to fully envelop and nurture our seeking; others who have been silenced by oppression seek to voice the joy of spiritual reunion in an evocative counterpoint. As frightening as it may be to “center down,” we must find the stillness at the core of the shout, the pause in the middle of the “amen,” as first steps toward restoration."

We must find a way to return to this place, live in this place, abide in this place of inner silence. Outer silence means very little if there is not a deeper inner silence. Everything else appears much clearer when it appears or emerges out of silence.

Without silence, we do not really experience our experiences. We are here, but not in the depth of here. We have many experiences, but they do not have the power to change us, awaken us, or give us the joy and peace that the world cannot give, as Jesus says (John 14:27).

Without some degree of inner and even outer silence, we are never living, never tasting the moment. The opposite of contemplation is not action, it is reaction. We must wait for pure action, which proceeds from deep silence.

About the Author: Fr. Richard Rohr is a Franciscan priest of the New Mexico Province and founder of the Center for Action and Contemplation (CAC) in Albuquerque, New Mexico. His teaching is grounded in the Franciscan alternative orthodoxy—practices of contemplation and self-emptying, expressing itself in radical compassion, particularly for the socially marginalized.

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Opposite Of Meditation Is Not Action, It’s Reaction
How do you relate to the notion that pure action proceeds from deep silence? Can you share an experience of a time you were able to return to the core of the shout or the pause in the middle of your amen? What helps you stay grounded in primal presence?
Jagdish P Dave wrote: Sadly, the world we live in has a little time to slow down and has a little time to be silent. Both our outer world and our inner world has a little time to pause, see, listen and contemplate. Both wo…
David Doane wrote: As Richard Rohr says, silence is a primal presence. It can be very helpful in finding stillness, finding one’s inner core, one’s real self, one’s connection to all that is or Being. Being …
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463.jpgJoin us for a conference call this Saturday, with a global group of ServiceSpace friends and our insightful guest speaker. Join the Forest Call >>

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Back in 1997, one person started sending this simple “meditation reminder” to a few friends. Soon after, “Wednesdays” started, ServiceSpace blossomed, and the humble experiments of service took a life of its own. If you’d like to start an Awakin gathering in your area, we’d be happy to help you get started.

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How to Be Alone

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DailyGood News That Inspires

April 27, 2020

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How to Be Alone

I wish I could show you when you are lonely or in darkness the astonishing light of your own being.

– Hafiz –

How to Be Alone

This charming video pays tribute to the happy wholesomeness of being alone. Tanya Davis recites her poem about the ways of solitude, gently cataloging all the places where aloneness can bring freedom and healing. Whether at a lunch counter, park bench, mountain trail, or on the edge of a dance floor – all you have to do is love yourself enough, to love being alone. { read more }

Be The Change

Sit for an hour in silence and notice the difference between impulses and insights.

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Alone But Not Lonely

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DailyGood News That Inspires

April 26, 2020

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Alone But Not Lonely

You cannot be lonely if you like the person you’re alone with.

– Wayne Dyer –

Alone But Not Lonely

“We live in a rural farm in India, don’t have a TV at home, and have bought our son a total of two toys. Most of his clothes are gifted by family and friends. He doesn’t eat cookies, chocolates, carbonated drinks, or fast food. He must be one miserable kid, right? If I say, ‘No,’ one might respond with, ‘Well, he doesn’t know what he is missing and he is being brought up in an extremely protective environment.’ Not true either. He knows the reasons and has willingly embraced them. His secret seems to be that everything has meaning for him. He is not chasing after anything and has no plans for tomorrow. He goes around as if he has an unlimited reserve of energy, curiosity, time, faith and willingness to be engaged with whatever and whoever comes his way. And he doesn’t seem to be bothered by being alone.” In a time of mandatory self-isolation and disrupted school-based education, this lovely piece by a homeschooling parent offers much to reflect on. { read more }

Be The Change

For more inspiration, check out, “The Value of Solitude”, by William Deresiewicz. It begins with these intriguing lines: “Loneliness is not the absence of company, it is grief over that absence. The lost sheep is lonely; the shepherd is not lonely.” { more }

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Every Act a Ceremony

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DailyGood News That Inspires

April 25, 2020

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Every Act a Ceremony

The purpose of any ceremony is to build stronger relationship or bridge the distance between our cosmos and us.

– Shawn Wilson –

Every Act a Ceremony

“In a ceremony, one attends fully to the task at hand, performing each action just as it should be. A ceremony is therefore a practice for all of life, a practice in doing everything just as it should be done. An earnest ceremonial practice is like a magnet that aligns more and more of life to its field; it is a prayer that asks, “May everything I do be a ceremony. May I do everything with full attention, full care, and full respect for what it serves.” In this essay Charles Eisenstein explores what modern people can draw from the ceremonial approach to life, as practiced by traditional, indigenous, and place-based peoples, as well as esoteric lineages within the dominant culture. { read more }

Be The Change

What is your own relationship to ceremony and ritual? In this time when many of us are sheltering in place, take a moment to reflect on the sacred potential in the simplest objects and actions of everyday life. For more inspiration, check out Carrie Newcomer’s beautiful song: “Holy as the Day is Spent.” { more }

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My Freedom Is In Your Hands

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DailyGood News That Inspires

April 24, 2020

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My Freedom Is In Your Hands

Perhaps nothing is so fraught with significance as the human hand.

– Jane Addams –

My Freedom Is In Your Hands

“What if this virus had a hidden agenda other than spreading fear about how it might compromise our health? What if hidden in its drive to be contagious, there was another message, urging to be heard? Whether we come running or are being dragged, this virus teaches us to consider each other in a whole new way. Much like prisoners, we are being asked to give up our personal freedom to protect society from ourselves. We get a brief taste, with these temporary ‘shelter in place’ orders, what it might be like to be confined for decades on end. Please consider what it is like, to be elderly or in bad health — and trapped inside prison?” Jacques Verduin, is the Founding Director of the Insight Prison Project, a non-profit which helps prisoners and challenged youth create the personal and systemic change to transform violence and suffering into opportunities for learning and healing. He shares more in this piece, that includes a powerful “hand washing meditation.” { read more }

Be The Change

Bring Verduin’s words to mind and heart each time you wash your hands this week. For more inspiration, check out this interview with him about “Guiding Rage into Power.” { more }

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