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Archive for August, 2016

The Loneliness of the Modern Nomad

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DailyGood News That Inspires

August 31, 2016

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The Loneliness of the Modern Nomad

A man travels the world for what he needs and returns home to find it.

– George Edward Moore –

The Loneliness of the Modern Nomad

Author Kira Newman shares insights from Melody Warnick’s new book, “This Is Where You Belong,” where Warnick chronicles her own journey toward “place attachment,” a series of research-backed experiments and practices designed to make one love where one lives { read more }

Be The Change

What is your relationship to the place where you live? Reflect on three things that you are grateful for about your current location.

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Before I Go: A Neurosurgeon’s Final Reflections On Mortality

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34 Affirmations For Healthy Living

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Kindness Weekly: Being Grateful for Life’s Gifts

KindSpring.org: Small Acts That Change the World

About KindSpring

For over a decade the KindSpring community has focused on inner transformation, while collectively changing the world with generosity, gratitude, and trust. We are 100% volunteer-run and totally non-commercial. KindSpring is a labor of love.

Inspiring Quote

Gratitude is the fairest blossom which springs from the soul. –Henry Ward Beecher

Member of the Week

thumb.jpgKEESEEKAYLA! Thank you for always looking for kindness opportunities and for teaching your son to Pay It Forward with kindness. Send KEESEEKAYLA some KarmaBucks and say hello.

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August 30, 2016

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space EditorEditor’s note: Dear Friends, Studies now confirm that simply being grateful significantly increases well-being and happiness. Gratitude is now one of the major pillars behind the new field of positive psychology. Regularly practicing gratitude not only offers health benefits by building stronger immune systems but increases our ability to express more compassion and kindness. With deep gratitude to our kindness community. –Ameeta space
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Small Acts of Kindness

space mandymoo900 wrote: “I gave money to my taxi driver so that he could pick up a lady who has severe mental illness to take her home. It has been really cold and I just had to help.”
space carlawaco wrote: “I picked up trash in front of my neighbors house”
space myfbil wrote: “I am donating items to be shipped to LA to help with the animals rescued from the floods. “
space Give Freely space
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Featured Kindness Stories

Story1 The homeless man gave him a gift on his birthday which made a lasting impression.
Story2 She saw the mother and daughter in the rain, which led to a string of kind acts in NYC.
Story3 A knock at the door and a weekly hug mean the world to this elderly resident.
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Idea of the Week

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For more ideas, visit the ideas section of our website.
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Running as Spiritual Practice

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DailyGood News That Inspires

August 30, 2016

a project of ServiceSpace

Running as Spiritual Practice

Go fast enough to get there, but slow enough to see.

– Jimmy Buffett –

Running as Spiritual Practice

“For the Summer Olympics, we explore a topic our listeners have called out as a passionate force and a connector across all kinds of boundaries in American culture: running. Not just as exercise, or as a merely physical pursuit, but running as a source of bonding between parents and children and friends; running as an interplay between competition and contemplation; running and body image and survival and healing.” { read more }

Be The Change

Make time to run or walk today instead of driving, or just working indoors.

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Awakin Weekly: Taking a Stand

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InnerNet Weekly: Inspirations from ServiceSpace.org
Taking a Stand
by Lynne Twist

[Listen to Audio!]

2098.jpgOver two thousand years ago, the mathematician Archimedes said, “Give me a place to stand and I’ll move the world.” Taking a stand is a way of living and being that draws on a place within yourself that is at the very heart of who you are. When you take a stand you find your place in the universe, and you have the capacity to move the world.

Stand-takers have lived in every era of history. Many of them never held public office, but they changed history through the sheer power, integrity, and authenticity of who they became as a result of the stand they took. Remarkable human beings such as Mother Teresa, Dr. Jane Goodall, Marion Wright Edelman, President Nelson Mandela and President Vaclav Havel lived their lives from stands they took that transcended their identities or their personal opinions.

Anyone who has the courage to take a stand with their life joins these remarkable figures. You may not become famous or win the Nobel Prize. Your work may be centered on raising children or any of the other tasks that contribute to the evolution of humanity. Whatever you do, your stand gives you a kind of authenticity, power, and clarity.

[…]

When you have taken a stand with your life, you see the world as the remarkable, unlimited, boundless possibility that it is. And people see themselves through your eyes in new ways; they become more authentic in your presence because they know you see them for who they really are. The negativity, the dysfunction, the positionality begin to fall away and they feel “gotten,” heard, or known.

Archbishop Desmond Tutu speaks about the South African Truth and Reconciliation Commission, which he chaired. During the commission’s sessions, people had the courage to forgive the person who murdered their daughter, or amputated the arms and legs of their son. They forgave horrible atrocities and rose above the sea of hatred and entered a new place where they could take a stand for life. In the presence of a stand such as we witnessed in South Africa, positionality dissolves and people find a place in their hearts and souls for forgiveness.

Buckminster Fuller once said, “When you discover the truth, it is always beautiful, and beautiful for everyone with no one left out.” This is also true of taking a stand. Taking a position does not create an environment of inclusiveness and tolerance; instead, it creates even greater levels of entrenchment, often by insisting that for me to be right, you must be wrong.

Taking a stand does not preclude you from taking a position. One needs to take a position from time to time to get things done or to make a point. But when a stand is taken it inspires everyone. It elevates the quality of the dialog and engenders integrity, alignment, and deep trust. Taking a stand can shape a person’s life and actions and give them access to profound truths that can empower the emergence of new paradigms and a shift in the course of history.

About the Author: Lynne Twist in Find a Place to Stand.

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Taking a Stand
What does taking a stand mean to you? Can you share a personal story of a time you took a stand? What practice helps you find the courage to take a stand?
Mariette wrote: I deeply resonated with Lynne Twist’s differentiation between taking a stand and taking a position. So many of us believe that if there is a winner, there must be a loser, that uplifting a trut…
david doane wrote: Taking a stand means to firmly assert in words and/or action a position. We are often taking a stand on small matters. I recently took a stand on a major issue and I did it with trepidati…
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Many years ago, a couple friends got together to sit in silence for an hour, and share personal aha-moments. That birthed this newsletter, and rippled out as Awakin Circles in 80+ living rooms around the globe. To join in Santa Clara this week, RSVP online.

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Some Good News

The Left Shoe
How Do You Heal From Sorrow Beyond Compare?
They & The Emotional Weight of Words

Video of the Week

The Power of a Cup of Tea

Kindness Stories

Global call with Carol Ruth Silver!
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Back in 1997, one person started sending this simple “meditation reminder” to a few friends. Soon after, “Wednesdays” started, ServiceSpace blossomed, and the humble experiments of service took a life of its own. If you’d like to start an Awakin gathering in your area, we’d be happy to help you get started.

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On our website, you can view 17+ year archive of these readings. For broader context, visit our umbrella organization: ServiceSpace.org.

Thirteen Ways of Looking at Community

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DailyGood News That Inspires

August 29, 2016

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Thirteen Ways of Looking at Community

We were born to unite with our fellow men, and to join in community with the human race.

– -Cicero- –

Thirteen Ways of Looking at Community

Whether we know it or not, like it or not, honor it or not, we are embedded in community. Whether we think of ourselves as biological creatures or spiritual beings or both, the truth remains: we were created in and for a complex ecology of relatedness, and without it we wither and die. This simple fact has critical implications: community is not a goal to be achieved but a gift to be received. When we treat community as a product that we must manufacture instead of a gift we have been given, it will elude us eternally. When we try to “make community happen,” driven by desire, design, and determination — places within us where the ego often lurks — we can make a good guess at the outcome: we will exhaust ourselves and alienate each other, snapping the connections we yearn for. Too many relationships have been diminished or destroyed by a drive toward “community-building” which evokes a grasping that is the opposite of what we need to do: relax into our created condition and receive the gift we have been given. { read more }

Be The Change

Relax into the community you’ve been given and embrace your interconnectedness with others.

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They & The Emotional Weight of Words

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DailyGood News That Inspires

August 28, 2016

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They & The Emotional Weight of Words

It is easy to forget how full the world is of people, full to bursting, and each of them imaginable and consistently misimagined.

– John Green –

They & The Emotional Weight of Words

“Language is the space in which we carve a place for ourselves, where we demand to be seen. A reflection point for culture, community, and family to acknowledge our existence on our terms.” For many, the pronouns ‘he’ and ‘she’ are limiting and do not adequately express their identity. “The entire lexicon for how we understand gender is shifting. For many of us, it can be a weighty, disorienting experience. But for a handful of us, this is a moment of freedom. If each of us does our part to challenge old language that pushes us back into small gender boxes, all of us will be a bit more free. Eventually we will align language with the complexity and beauty of our bodies and our authentic selves.” { read more }

Be The Change

Consider how your language and assumptions about other people might be distancing rather than accepting. Try to see each person you encounter today as a unique, multi-faceted individual.

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The Left Shoe

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DailyGood News That Inspires

August 26, 2016

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The Left Shoe

The world has enough for everyone’s need, but not enough for everyone’s greed.

– Mahatma Gandhi –

The Left Shoe

Remember the joy of a new pair of shoes? This beautiful film, based on a story attributed to Gandhi’s life, depicts the lives of two boys. It is the first film by then, 20-year old filmmaker, Sarah Rozik, and won the Jury’s special award in the short film category at the 2014 Luxor Egyptian and European Film Festival. { read more }

Be The Change

Read about the story that inspired this film – Gandhi and his lost shoe. { more }

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The Power of a Cup of Tea

This week’s inspiring video: The Power of a Cup of Tea
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KarmaTube.org

Video of the Week

Aug 25, 2016
The Power of a Cup of Tea

The Power of a Cup of Tea

Conor Curran, a former Marine, is a veteran of the war in Iraq. One summer day in July 2007, while Curran and his squad were patrolling a poor area in the city of Ramadi, Curran encountered an Iraqi who would change his life and teach him about a different kind of power – the power to transform, to grow, to create. After leaving the U.S. armed forces and taking time to heal and reflect, Curran works on projects in his hometown which promote conscious living.
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To All Artists Known and Unknown

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DailyGood News That Inspires

August 25, 2016

a project of ServiceSpace

To All Artists Known and Unknown

I propose that one attribute of the production of those makers we call artists, historically and culturally, constitutes a kind of prosthetic activity to address an unforgettable and irreconcilable absence.

– Richard Berger –

To All Artists Known and Unknown

“The radiant little man died at the Art Institute. I knew he was homeless and hanging out at the school, but I was unaware that he was living there. He died of exposure over Christmas break, and when he was found beneath a concrete overhang on the Jones Street side of the school, they found a number of sketchbooks in a backpack.” From artist Richard Bergers beautiful reflection on the life and work of an unknown artist … { read more }

Be The Change

Do you know someone with an extraordinary, but hidden gift? Do something to shine a spotlight on their talent, even if it is just through a note of appreciation or a heartfelt compliment.

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Is Artistic Inspiration Contagious?

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DailyGood News That Inspires

August 24, 2016

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Is Artistic Inspiration Contagious?

The best and most beautiful things in the world cannot be seen or even touched – they must be felt with the heart.

– Helen Keller –

Is Artistic Inspiration Contagious?

When you hear the word contagious, most people assume it applies to catching the flu or a cold from someone. But researchers are now finally testing to see if there is some contagious inspiration between reading and writing that would ultimately show “the power of the written word as a vehicle for sharing the peaks of human experience.” { read more }

Be The Change

Next time you put pen to paper, or pick up a book to read, try to be aware of any inspirational undertones you may feel.

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