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Archive for May, 2019

Why We Walk

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DailyGood News That Inspires

May 31, 2019

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Why We Walk

We do have enough time. Life is long, if we listen to ourselves often enough, and look up.

– Erling Kagge –

Why We Walk

Erling Kagge is a Norwegian explorer, lawyer, art collector, author, and the first person to have completed the Three Poles Challenge on foot –the North Pole, the South Pole and the summit of Mount Everest. Kagge is also the author of “Walking: One Step at a Time,” and six other books. What follows is an excerpt from Walking.

{ read more }

Be The Change

Consider what your own relationship to walking is in light of Kagge’s perspectives.

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7 Simple Ways to Cultivate Comfort

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Cellist Plays Bach in the Shadow of the U.S.-Mexico Border

This week’s inspiring video: Cellist Plays Bach in the Shadow of the U.S.-Mexico Border
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Video of the Week

May 30, 2019
Cellist Plays Bach in the Shadow of the U.S.-Mexico Border

Cellist Plays Bach in the Shadow of the U.S.-Mexico Border

With powerful words, performing music by Bach, renowned cellist Yo-Yo Ma reminds us of music’s unique power to connect and unite everyone. At the border between sister cities Laredo, Texas and Nuevo Laredo, Mexico, he quotes from the poem by Emma Lazarus on the base of the Statue of Liberty: "Give me your tired, your poor, your huddled masses, yearning to breathe free…". Like the Statue of Liberty, Yo-Yo Ma and his music exhort us to remember that "in culture we build bridges, not walls."
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School Strike for Climate Change

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DailyGood News That Inspires

May 30, 2019

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School Strike for Climate Change

I ask you to please wake up and make changes required possible

– Greta Thunberg –

School Strike for Climate Change

At a young age, Greta Thunberg realized that all of the facts and solutions about how to stop climate change are known. But why aren’t we applying this knowledge in order to make a difference? At age 15, Greta started a school strike outside the Swedish Parliament. While many people tell her that she should be in school or that she should study to be a climate scientist, Greta believes that if nobody does anything to stop climate change now, studying for her future will be a waste of time. She is doing what she can to bring attention to this crisis, and has inspired students around the world to take action for the planet. { read more }

Be The Change

Learn more about Greta Thunberg’s work. { more }

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George Orwell: Some Thoughts on the Common Toad

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DailyGood News That Inspires

May 29, 2019

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George Orwell: Some Thoughts on the Common Toad

Even in the most sordid street the coming of spring will register itself by some sign or other, if it is only a brighter blue between the chimney pots or the vivid green of an elder sprouting on a blitzed site.

– George Orwell –

George Orwell: Some Thoughts on the Common Toad

Novelist and essayist Eric Arthur Blair, pen name George Orwell, is perhaps best known for his prescient depictions of creeping totalitarianism and social injustice as captured in 1984 and Down and Out in Paris and London. Blair is also recognized as an avowed appreciator of the living world who intuitively understood nature’s role in transforming the human spirit in the aftermath of war: “I think that by retaining one’s childhood love of such things as trees, fishes, butterflies and to return to my first instance toads, one makes a peaceful and decent future a little more probable…” In his thought-provoking essay, Isaac Yuen explores the remarkable capacity for wonder and compassion that exemplifies Blair’s writing in “Some Thoughts on the Common Toad,” an ode to one of Earth’s most humble inhabitants. { read more }

Be The Change

Folded within the tender green whorl of a poplar bud, shimmering cobalt blue on a young bird’s wing, reflected in the golden perfection of a toad’s eye lies the secret sweetness of nature. Keep a diary of the small, hopeful manifestations of our planet’s capacity for renewal.

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Spotlight On Kindness: Planting Local Seeds

Seeds carried by the wind from a distant tree have less chance of taking root than seeds that fall from a nearby tree. Likewise, when we plant seeds of kindness in our own communities and tend to them regularly, we more likely create a solidly rooted tree of kindness that branches in all directions. Let’s plant small seeds of kindness nearby, rather than looking only for growth from afar. – Ameeta

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Editor’s Note: Seeds carried by the wind from a distant tree have less chance of taking root than seeds that fall from a nearby tree. Likewise, when we plant seeds of kindness in our own communities and tend to them regularly, we more likely create a solidly rooted tree of kindness that branches in all directions. Let’s plant small seeds of kindness nearby, rather than looking only for growth from afar. – Ameeta
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Wangari Maathai: Marching with Trees

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May 28, 2019

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Wangari Maathai: Marching with Trees

If you’re going to do anything for the environment, you have to see what has been disconnected.

– Wangari Maathai –

Wangari Maathai: Marching with Trees

The late Wangari Maathai–biologist, environmentalist, and the first African woman to win a Nobel Peace Prize–founded the Green Belt Movement to create designated areas of park, farm, and uncultivated land around communities. It has contributed to the planting of over 52 million trees. Across two decades, she was at times beaten and imprisoned as she battled powerful economic forces and Kenya’s tyrannical ruler. Her books include the memoir Unbowed and Replenishing the Earth: Spiritual Values for Healing Ourselves and the World. She’s also one of the 100 heroic women featured in the book Good Night Stories for Rebel Girls. Listen to her story as she is interviewed here. { read more }

Be The Change

Maathai battled both for conservation and for human rights. What can you plant today to bring more green into your community? What rights need defending in your area?

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Awakin Weekly: Stepping Over The Bag Of Gold

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InnerNet Weekly: Inspirations from ServiceSpace.org
Stepping Over The Bag Of Gold
by Rachel Naomi Remen

[Listen to Audio!]

2381.jpgMy patient, a physician who has cancer, comes to his session enormously pleased with himself. Knowing my love of stories, he says that he has found a perfect story and tells me the following parable:

Shiva and Shakti, the Divine Couple in Hinduism, are in their heavenly abode watching over the earth. They are touched by the challenges of human life, the complexity of human reactions, and the ever-present place of suffering in the human experience. As they watch, Shakti spies a miserably poor man walking down a road. His clothes are shabby and his sandals are tied together with a rope. Her heart is wrung with compassion. Touched by his goodness and his struggle, Shakti turns to her divine husband and begs him to give this man some gold. Shiva looks at the man for a long moment. "My Dearest Wife," he says, "I cannot do that." Shakti is astounded. "Why, what do you mean, Husband? You are the Lord of the Universe. Why can’t you do this simple thing?"

"I cannot give this to him because he is not yet ready to receive it," Shiva replies. Shakti becomes angry. "Do you mean to say that you cannot drop a bag of gold in his path?"

"Surely I can," Shiva replies, "but that is quite another thing."

"Please, Husband," says Shakti.

And so Shiva drops a bag of gold in the man’s path.

The man meanwhile walks along thinking to himself, "I wonder if I will find dinner tonight–or shall I go hungry again?" Turning a bend in the road, he sees something on the path in his way. "Aha," he says. "Look there, a large rock. How fortunate that I have seen it. I might have torn these poor sandals of mine even further." And carefully stepping over the bag of gold, he goes on his way.

It seems that Life drops many bags of gold in our path. Rarely do they look like what they are.

About the Author: Kitchen Table Wisdom (book), from "Grace" chapter, p88-89.

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Stepping Over The Bag Of Gold
How do you relate to the notion of being ready to receive the gifts life places in our way? Can you share a personal story of a time you recognized the gold that life placed on your path? What helps you see gold in every experience?
Rahul Brown wrote: In the most perceptive and grounded viewpoint, its not that Life drops many bags of gold in our path. Its actually that there is nothing but gold on our path. What keeps us from seeing it? We’re d…
Jagdish P Dave wrote: There are times when life offersa "bag of gold" or golden opportunities to us in our path of life. How come we don’t see them? As the saying states, " Beauty is in the eye of the be…
Kristin Pedemonti wrote: Love this! We see what we are ready to see. Oh my goodness yes in recognizing in my own life. I am currently driving across the US donating and sharing very low-cost workshops for survivors of trauma:…
David Doane wrote: I totally agree that there are many gifts of gold that life places in our path that we step over if we’re not ready to receive them. Gifts are always there and we receive those that we are ready f…
Kristin Pedemonti wrote: Thank you Somik for posting on my behalf. Testing to see if I can post. I’m using Chrome…
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Back in 1997, one person started sending this simple “meditation reminder” to a few friends. Soon after, “Wednesdays” started, ServiceSpace blossomed, and the humble experiments of service took a life of its own. If you’d like to start an Awakin gathering in your area, we’d be happy to help you get started.

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We Are Designed for Connection

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DailyGood News That Inspires

May 27, 2019

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We Are Designed for Connection

A contraction is an expansion waiting to happen. It just needs to be unpacked a little first.

– Diane Poole Heller –

We Are Designed for Connection

Diane Poole Heller, a licensed therapist and noted expert in trauma, integrative healing, and secure attachment, talks to Tami Simon of Sounds True about the different attachment styles that we pick up in childhood and carry subconsciously into our adult behaviors. They discuss strategies for coping with and healing from insecure and disorganized childhood attachment. Diane explains how these attachment patterns are engraved in both the mind and body, highlighting the long-term effects of trauma and neglect. { read more }

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Diane shares a visualization practice for disidentifying from generational trauma and strategies for increasing our innate connection to others. Experiment with one or two of these strategies this week.

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The Courageous Mary Oliver

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DailyGood News That Inspires

May 26, 2019

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The Courageous Mary Oliver

Don’t we all die someday and someday comes all too soon? What will you do with your own wild, glorious chance at this thing we call life?

– Mary Oliver –

The Courageous Mary Oliver

Lisa Starr shares her insights from the last years of her friend Mary Oliver’s life. From this deep perspective of love – we see Mary’s courage, strength and generosity. She lived her craft – listening for the words – to the very end – using them to transform the heartbreak of living into things of beauty. { read more }

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Is there a heartbreak in your life, that by changing your perspective – it could be transformed into a thing of beauty?

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George Orwell: Why I Write

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DailyGood News That Inspires

May 25, 2019

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George Orwell: Why I Write

Language ought to be the joint creation of poets and manual workers.

– George Orwell –

George Orwell: Why I Write

When George Orwell was sixteen, he discovered the joy of words while reading Paradise Lost. In this essay, Orwell considers his motivations for writing. In general, he believes writers are motivated by four reasons– sheer egoism, aesthetic enthusiasm, historical impulse, and political purpose. It is the age in which a writer lives that provides the reason. By 1936, Orwell was firmly grounded in political purpose: “Every line of serious work that I have written since 1936 has been written, directly or indirectly, against totalitarianism and for democratic socialism.” He explains this is not “wholly public-spirited,” but the drive by “some demon” and while he cannot be certain which of the motivations is actually stronger, it is only when his motivation is political that his books are alive and have meaning. { read more }

Be The Change

In your own work, consider your purpose and how it makes you come alive and have meaning.

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