In association with hhdlstudycirclemontreal.org

Archive for January, 2021

My First Best Friend

You’re receiving this email because you are a DailyGood subscriber.
Trouble Viewing? On a mobile? Just click here. Not interested anymore? Unsubscribe.
DailyGood News That Inspires

January 31, 2021

a project of ServiceSpace

My First Best Friend

If there is magic on this planet, it is contained in water.

– Loren Eiseley –

My First Best Friend

“In 1945, a child too young for school, I wandered from Grandma’s porch and a short distance away, found one of those little creeks that would be my playground for the next few years. Here I formed my first friendship.” Thus begins this writer’s meditation on the deep, and often overlooked, joy of water and its essential place in life. As she observes, the aging process has a way of deepening our sensitivity to the eternal…” { read more }

Be The Change

Take a few minutes and think back to your earliest memories of water. Was it at a lake, stream or river? Taking a bath? Playing with a watering hose? An experience at a beach as a wave rolled up across the wet sand over your bare feet? Do we take water, and its protection, too much for granted?

COMMENT | RATE Email Twitter FaceBook

Related Good News

Smile Big
Love Freely
Meditate
Give Back

Guide to Well-Being During Coronavirus

Being Resilient During Coronavirus

Children, Anger Control and Inuit Wisdom

Why Singing in a Choir Makes You Happier

Smile Big
Love Freely
Meditate
Give Back

I Wish My Teacher Knew…

Barbara Kingsolver on Knitting as Creation Story

Three Methods for Working with Chaos

One Love

DailyGood is a volunteer-run initiative that delivers “good news” to 245,424 subscribers. There are many ways to help. To unsubscribe, click here.

Other ServiceSpace projects include:

KindSpring // KarmaTube // Conversations // Awakin // More

Walking With George

You’re receiving this email because you are a DailyGood subscriber.
Trouble Viewing? On a mobile? Just click here. Not interested anymore? Unsubscribe.
DailyGood News That Inspires

January 30, 2021

a project of ServiceSpace

Walking With George

A dog can never tell you what she knows from the
smells of the world, but you know, watching her,
that you know almost nothing.

– Mary Oliver –

Walking With George

“I had never been good at practicing mindfulness, or being mindful–period–until I got a dog. Observing your breath, extolled as the surefire way to become present, left me in such a deep state of hyperventilation I quickly wanted a break from taking a break. I was in constant, anxious movement, starting projects but never finishing them, leaving things halfway done, forgetting items, moving from one thing to the next, constantly apprehensive. But then I got George Lucas: a miniature schnauzer that was the doppelganger of the Star Wars director, down to the salt-and-pepper beard and pensive dark eyes.” This lovely piece from Parabola magazine shares a story of mindfulness, connection and a canine teacher. { read more }

Be The Change

As a special gift to readers in these challenging times, Parabola has made a PDF of “The Search For Meaning” issue available for download. You can check it out here. { more }

COMMENT | RATE Email Twitter FaceBook

Related Good News

Smile Big
Love Freely
Meditate
Give Back

Guide to Well-Being During Coronavirus

Children, Anger Control and Inuit Wisdom

Translating Meaning Into Life: A Taoist Parable

Why Singing in a Choir Makes You Happier

Smile Big
Love Freely
Meditate
Give Back

How to Strengthen Your Inner Shield

Three Methods for Working with Chaos

16 Teachings from COVID-19

Love in the Time of Coronavirus

DailyGood is a volunteer-run initiative that delivers “good news” to 245,430 subscribers. There are many ways to help. To unsubscribe, click here.

Other ServiceSpace projects include:

KindSpring // KarmaTube // Conversations // Awakin // More

Contact with the Sacred

You’re receiving this email because you are a DailyGood subscriber.
Trouble Viewing? On a mobile? Just click here. Not interested anymore? Unsubscribe.
DailyGood News That Inspires

January 29, 2021

a project of ServiceSpace

Contact with the Sacred

And while I stood there I saw more than I can tell and I understood more than I saw; for I was seeing in a sacred manner the shapes of all things in the spirit, and the shape of all shapes as they must live together like one being.

– Black Elk –

Contact with the Sacred

With spectacular visual images, this film reminds us of the necessity of connecting with the sacred in everyday life. It honors the sacred through sensory feelings of connection, with both the vast expanses such as mountain tops and waterfalls, and with the single dandelion sending its seeds into the future. This connection is further enhanced by the peaceful music that accompanies the images, providing an immersive experience. { read more }

Be The Change

As you go through your day make note of the people and places you encounter who help you to connect with the sacred.

COMMENT | RATE Email Twitter FaceBook

Related Good News

Smile Big
Love Freely
Meditate
Give Back

This is Me at 68: Elders Reflect During Crisis

Barbara Kingsolver on Knitting as Creation Story

On Being Alone

Orion’s 25 Most-Read Articles of the Decade

Smile Big
Love Freely
Meditate
Give Back

A Tribute to Mary Oliver

The Monkey and the River

The Understory: Life Beneath the Forest Floor

Beyond Overwhelm into Refuge

DailyGood is a volunteer-run initiative that delivers “good news” to 245,425 subscribers. There are many ways to help. To unsubscribe, click here.

Other ServiceSpace projects include:

KindSpring // KarmaTube // Conversations // Awakin // More

For the Sake of One We Love and Are Losing: A Meditative Poem

You’re receiving this email because you are a DailyGood subscriber.
Trouble Viewing? On a mobile? Just click here. Not interested anymore? Unsubscribe.
DailyGood News That Inspires

January 28, 2021

a project of ServiceSpace

For the Sake of One We Love and Are Losing: A Meditative Poem

She was no longer wrestling with the grief, but could sit down with it as a lasting companion and make it a sharer in her thoughts.

– George Eliot –

For the Sake of One We Love and Are Losing: A Meditative Poem

The origin story of “For the Sake of One We Love and Are Losing” lies in a dream that writer Phyllis Cole-Dai had last year. This remarkable poem was published in the early days of the pandemic that has now claimed over 2 million lives worldwide. Cole-Dai’s words have comforted many people through the grief and loss of these challenging times. What follows here is the poem’s backstory in her own words, as well an exquisite downloadable version of the poem– for anyone who might benefit from the solace and support it offers. { read more }

Be The Change

Join this Saturday’s Awakin Call with Phyllis Cole-Dai: Writing Across the Divide. More details and RSVP info here. { more }

COMMENT | RATE Email Twitter FaceBook

Related Good News

Smile Big
Love Freely
Meditate
Give Back

Being Resilient During Coronavirus

Why Singing in a Choir Makes You Happier

On Being Alone

Orion’s 25 Most-Read Articles of the Decade

Smile Big
Love Freely
Meditate
Give Back

The Monkey and the River

Love in the Time of Coronavirus

A Pandemic Poem-Prayer

Two Words That Can Change a Life

DailyGood is a volunteer-run initiative that delivers “good news” to 245,417 subscribers. There are many ways to help. To unsubscribe, click here.

Other ServiceSpace projects include:

KindSpring // KarmaTube // Conversations // Awakin // More

Spotlight On Kindness: Against All Odds

Have you ever noticed that some people walk around like they’re carrying the secret to life in their little pockets? Nothing really seems to get in their way. Even if it does, it’s just another obstacle that they climb over and joyfully move along to the next thing. It’s not that they don’t suffer the same fate as the rest of us, just that no curveball in life keeps them down for too long. This week’s stories celebrate the strength of their spirits, conviction, their love of living, and loving those around them. –Guri

View In Browser
Weekly KindSpring Newsletter
Home | Contact
Spotlight On
Kindness
A Weekly Offering
Love
“Impossible odds set the stage for amazing miracles.” –Jentezen Franklin
Smile
Editor’s Note: Have you ever noticed that some people walk around like they’re carrying the secret to life in their little pockets? Nothing really seems to get in their way. Even if it does, it’s just another obstacle that they climb over and joyfully move along to the next thing. It’s not that they don’t suffer the same fate as the rest of us, just that no curveball in life keeps them down for too long. This week’s stories celebrate the strength of their spirits, conviction, their love of living, and loving those around them. –Guri
Kindness Rocks
Kindness In the News
In Alaska, an all-female team of four remarkable healthcare heroes — a doctor, two nurses, and a pharmacist — are braving frigid conditions to get the Covid-19 vaccine to the most remote villages.
Read More
Kindness is Contagious.
From Our Members
Years ago, he missed out on making someone’s day, but he didn’t forget the lesson. Until one day, a small act of kindness from him became a much-needed gesture of humanity for another.
Read More
Inspiring Video of the Week
Serve all
Play
Blind Painter
Hugs John Bramblitt lost his sight to epilepsy early on, but that did not deter him from pursuing his love of painting. Here is the profound story of an incredible painter that did not let the odds limit him.
In Giving, We Receive
In other news …
2020 has taught us important lessons, especially when it comes to taking care of ourselves and each other. According to the Greater Good Science Center, here are the surprising five skills that we all need for the year ahead.
FB Twitter
KindSpring is a 100% volunteer-run platform that allows everyday people around the world to connect and deepen in the spirit of kindness. Current subscribers: 145,039

Having trouble reading this? View it in your browser.

Subscribe | Unsubscribe.

Freedom University: We Can Be More

This week’s inspiring video: Freedom University: We Can Be More
Having trouble reading this mail? View it in your browser. Not interested anymore? Unsubscribe
KarmaTube.org

Video of the Week

Jan 27, 2021
Freedom University: We Can Be More

Freedom University: We Can Be More

Freedom University is an award-winning, modern-day freedom school for undocumented students who are banned from equal access to public higher education in Georgia. With the aim of “ending modern segregation in higher education” – and of a future where undocumented and documented students can learn in the same classrooms – Freedom University provides tuition-free college preparation classes, college and scholarship application assistance for students seeking higher education opportunities in private universities or outside Georgia, and social movement leadership development for undocumented students.
Watch Video Now Share: Email Twitter FaceBook

Related KarmaTube Videos

Smile Big
Meditate
Live It Up
Serve All

“Life is Easy”

Mother Trees Connect the Forest

Seven Habits of Mindful Eating

Caine’s Cardboard Arcade

About KarmaTube:
KarmaTube is a collection of inspiring videos accompanied by simple actions every viewer can take. We invite you to get involved.
Other ServiceSpace Projects:

DailyGood // Conversations // iJourney // HelpOthers

MovedByLove // CF Sites // Karma Kitchen // More

Thank you for helping us spread the good. This newsletter now reaches 68,935 subscribers.

The Blue Hour: A Celebration of Nature’s Rarest Color

You’re receiving this email because you are a DailyGood subscriber.
Trouble Viewing? On a mobile? Just click here. Not interested anymore? Unsubscribe.
DailyGood News That Inspires

January 27, 2021

a project of ServiceSpace

The Blue Hour: A Celebration of Nature's Rarest Color

I think the real miracle is not to walk either on water or in thin air, but to walk on earth. Every day we are engaged in a miracle which we don’t even recognize: a blue sky, white clouds, green leaves, the black, curious eyes of a child — our own two eyes. All is a miracle.

– Thich Nhat Hanh –

The Blue Hour: A Celebration of Nature’s Rarest Color

“Blue, Rebecca Solnit wrote in one of humanitys most beautiful reflections on our planets primary hue, is the color of solitude and of desire, the color of there seen from here the color of longing for the distances you never arrive in, for the blue world, a world of many blues a pioneering 19th-century nomenclature of colors listed eleven kinds of blue, in hues as varied as the color of the flax-flower and the throat of the blue titmouse and the stamina of a certain species of anemone. Darwin took this guide with him on The Beagle in order to better describe what he saw. We name in order to see better and apprehend only what we know how to name, how to think about.” Maria Popova shares more in this lovely exploration of ‘The Blue Hour’, a book by French author, illustrator Isabelle Simler. { read more }

Be The Change

What does the color blue evoke for you? Try and be aware of the places this shade shows up in your life today. What do you notice that you perhaps might have missed before?

COMMENT | RATE Email Twitter FaceBook

Related Good News

Smile Big
Love Freely
Meditate
Give Back

111 Trees

Big Picture Competition: Celebrating Earth’s Diversity

Children, Anger Control and Inuit Wisdom

Translating Meaning Into Life: A Taoist Parable

Smile Big
Love Freely
Meditate
Give Back

Barbara Kingsolver on Knitting as Creation Story

Bye Bye Plastic Bags

A Tribute to Mary Oliver

One Love

DailyGood is a volunteer-run initiative that delivers “good news” to 245,420 subscribers. There are many ways to help. To unsubscribe, click here.

Other ServiceSpace projects include:

KindSpring // KarmaTube // Conversations // Awakin // More

Don Berwick: Health Care as a Loving Relationship

You’re receiving this email because you are a DailyGood subscriber.
Trouble Viewing? On a mobile? Just click here. Not interested anymore? Unsubscribe.
DailyGood News That Inspires

January 26, 2021

a project of ServiceSpace

Don Berwick: Health Care as a Loving Relationship

When the fabric of communities upon which health depends is torn, then healers are called to mend it. The moral law within insists so. Improving the social determinants of health will be brought at last to a boil only by the heat of the moral determinants of health.

– Donald Berwick –

Don Berwick: Health Care as a Loving Relationship

For the past 30 years, Donald Berwick has been one of the nation’s leading authorities and innovators of quality and improvement in the U.S. healthcare system. A pediatrician by training, a professor at both Harvard Medical School and the School of Public Health, and a top health care administrator during the Obama Administration, Berwick challenges administrators, policy makers, and doctors to go beyond the standard discussion of systems, strategies, and statistics to something more essential, more human–something he considers moral. The secret to improving quality in medical care, he argues, is love. { read more }

Be The Change

Join today’s conversation with Don Berwick, at 10AM PST. More details and RSVP info here. { more }

COMMENT | RATE Email Twitter FaceBook

Related Good News

Smile Big
Love Freely
Meditate
Give Back

Being Resilient During Coronavirus

This is Me at 68: Elders Reflect During Crisis

On Being Alone

How to Strengthen Your Inner Shield

Smile Big
Love Freely
Meditate
Give Back

Orion’s 25 Most-Read Articles of the Decade

The Joy of Being a Woman in Her Seventies

One Love

Love in the Time of Coronavirus

DailyGood is a volunteer-run initiative that delivers “good news” to 245,447 subscribers. There are many ways to help. To unsubscribe, click here.

Other ServiceSpace projects include:

KindSpring // KarmaTube // Conversations // Awakin // More

Awakin Weekly: Solitude Is Where Community Begins

Email not displaying correctly? View it in your browser.
InnerNet Weekly: Inspirations from ServiceSpace.org
Solitude Is Where Community Begins
by Henri Nouwen

[Listen to Audio!]

2476.jpgSolitude is where community begins. That’s where we listen to God. Sometimes I think of life as a big wagon wheel with many spokes. In the middle is the hub. Often in ministry, it looks like we are running around the rim trying to reach everybody. But God says, “Start in the hub; live in the hub. Then you will be connected with all the spokes, and you won’t have to run so fast.”

It’s precisely in the hub that we discover the call to community. It’s remarkable that solitude always calls us to community. In solitude you realize you’re part of a human family and that you want to lift something together.

By community, I don’t mean formal communities. I mean families, friends, parishes, twelve­step programs, prayer groups. Community is not an organization; community is a way of living: you gather around you people with whom you want to proclaim the truth that we are the beloved sons and daughters of God.

Community is not easy. Somebody once said, “Community is the place where the person you least want to live with always lives.” In Jesus’ community of twelve apostles, the last name was that of someone who was going to betray him. That person is always in your community somewhere; in the eyes of others, you might be that person.

Why is it so important that solitude come before community? If we do not know we are the beloved sons and daughters of God, we’re going to expect someone in the community to make us feel that way. They cannot. We’ll expect someone to give us that perfect unconditional love. But community is not loneliness grabbing onto loneliness: “I’m so lonely, and you’re so lonely.” It’s solitude grabbing onto solitude: “I am the beloved; you are the beloved; together we can build a home.”

Sometimes you are close, and that’s wonderful. Sometimes you don’t feel much love, and that’s hard. But we can be faithful. We can build a home together and create space for the sacred.

Within the discipline of community are the disciplines of forgiveness and celebration. Forgiveness and celebration are what make community, whether a marriage, a friendship, or any other form of community.

What is forgiveness? Forgiveness is to allow the other person not to be God. Forgiveness says, “I know you love me, but you don’t have to love me unconditionally, because no human being can do that.” We all have wounds. We all are in so much pain. It’s precisely this feeling of loneliness that lurks behind all our successes, that feeling of uselessness that hides under all the praise, that feeling of meaninglessness even when people say we are fantastic—that is what makes us sometimes grab onto people and expect from them an affection and love they cannot give.

If we want other people to give us something that only God can give, we become a demon. We say, “Love me!” and before you know it we become violent and demanding and manipulative. It’s so important that we keep forgiving one another — not once in a while, but every moment of life. Before you have had your breakfast, you have already had at least three opportunities to forgive people, because your mind is already wondering, "What will they think about me? What will he or she do? How will they use me?"

To forgive other people for being able to give you only a little love — that’s a hard discipline. To keep asking others for forgiveness because you can give only a little love — that’s a hard discipline, too. It hurts to say to your children, to your wife or your husband, to your friends, that you cannot give them all that you would like to give. Still, that is where community starts to be created, when we come together in a forgiving and undemanding way.

This is where celebration, the second discipline of community, comes in. If you can forgive that another person cannot give you what only God can give, then you can celebrate that person’s gift. Then you can see the love that person is giving you as a reflection of God’s great unconditional love. “Love one another because I have loved you first.” When we have known that first love, we can see the love that comes to us from people as the reflection of that. We can celebrate that and say, "Wow, that’s beautiful!"

About the Author: Excerpted from here.

Share the Wisdom:
Email Twitter FaceBook
Latest Community Insights New!
Solitude Is Where Community Begins
How do you relate to the connection between the discipline of community and the disciplines of forgiveness and celebration? Can you share a personal story of a time you were able to exercise the discipline of forgiveness and celebration? What helps you recognize the reflection of the ultimate unconditional love in the love that anyone gives you?
Jagdish P Dave wrote: In the worldly world, we judge people who are outwardly and inwardly different from us and who may have a differentorientation to life. Sadly, such a way of thinkingand behaving has caused divisivenes…
Share/Read Your Reflections
Awakin Circles:
Many years ago, a couple friends got together to sit in silence for an hour, and share personal aha-moments. That birthed this newsletter, and rippled out as Awakin Circles in 80+ living rooms around the globe. To join in Santa Clara this week, RSVP online.

RSVP For Wednesday

Some Good News

• Amanda Gorman: The Miracle of Morning
• Social Distance: A Community-Style Poem
• Lisa Dolby Chadwick: Letting in the Light

Video of the Week

• The Miracle of Morning

Kindness Stories

Global call with Don Berwick!
550.jpgJoin us for a conference call this Saturday, with a global group of ServiceSpace friends and our insightful guest speaker. Join the Forest Call >>

About
Back in 1997, one person started sending this simple “meditation reminder” to a few friends. Soon after, “Wednesdays” started, ServiceSpace blossomed, and the humble experiments of service took a life of its own. If you’d like to start an Awakin gathering in your area, we’d be happy to help you get started.

Forward to a Friend

Awakin Weekly delivers weekly inspiration to its 93,964 subscribers. We never spam or host any advertising. And you can unsubscribe anytime, within seconds.

On our website, you can view 17+ year archive of these readings. For broader context, visit our umbrella organization: ServiceSpace.org.

Social Distance: A Community-Style Poem

You’re receiving this email because you are a DailyGood subscriber.
Trouble Viewing? On a mobile? Just click here. Not interested anymore? Unsubscribe.
DailyGood News That Inspires

January 25, 2021

a project of ServiceSpace

Social Distance: A Community-Style Poem

A person is a person through other persons; you can’t be human in isolation; you are human only in relationships.

– Desmond Tutu –

Social Distance: A Community-Style Poem

In the early weeks of the pandemic last year, “NPR asked listeners to respond to art with a poem — a style of poetry called ekphrastic. For inspiration, Kwame Alexander, NPR’s poet in residence, selected two paintings: Kadir Nelson’s Heatwave and Salvador Dali’s Young Woman At A Window. Both show women inside looking longingly out into the world. The paintings struck a chord with those experiencing the global coronavirus pandemic quarantined inside. We received more than 1,300 submissions. Alexander took lines and excerpts from some of the submissions and created a crowdsourced, community poem of hope.” Check it out here. { read more }

Be The Change

Whether you consider yourself a poet or not, try writing a haiku (or other form of verse) on your experience of social distancing.

COMMENT | RATE Email Twitter FaceBook

Related Good News

Smile Big
Love Freely
Meditate
Give Back

111 Trees

Being Resilient During Coronavirus

Big Picture Competition: Celebrating Earth’s Diversity

Translating Meaning Into Life: A Taoist Parable

Smile Big
Love Freely
Meditate
Give Back

Barbara Kingsolver on Knitting as Creation Story

A Tribute to Mary Oliver

16 Teachings from COVID-19

A Pandemic Poem-Prayer

DailyGood is a volunteer-run initiative that delivers “good news” to 245,454 subscribers. There are many ways to help. To unsubscribe, click here.

Other ServiceSpace projects include:

KindSpring // KarmaTube // Conversations // Awakin // More