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Archive for July, 2021

Clarksville Elementary School: We Are the World

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DailyGood News That Inspires

July 31, 2021

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Clarksville Elementary School: We Are the World

Love is the cause of unity in all things.

– Aristotle –

Clarksville Elementary School: We Are the World

All 500 students from Clarksville Elementary School in Indiana worked with their music teacher over the course of the pandemic school year to create this heartwarming music video to showcase their talents and to bring smiles to the world. The exuberance and enthusiasm of these young singers remind us that they are the world, they are the future, and we can all make a better day when we stand together as one. { read more }

Be The Change

Watch this video with children in your life and sing along together, sharing the spirit of the children and their joyous music.

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Becoming an Ancestor

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July 30, 2021

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Becoming an Ancestor

This quiet dust was gentlemen and ladies
and lads and girls.
Was laughter and ability and sighing,
And frocks and curls.

– Emily Dickinson, –

Becoming an Ancestor

“Did you know that we’re all on our way to becoming someone’s ancestor? It’s true. We’re all future dead people, and 100 years from now, someone like me will come looking for you. I
know this for a fact because that’s usually have at least one in each generation, much like Buffy the Vampire Slayer. We’re a bit obsessive about what we do.You say you have no interest in family history or genealogy? Perhaps you never knew your biological family. Maybe you’re estranged from them. Or you have zero interest in learning about your ethnic heritage. Regardless, on your way to becoming an ancestor, you have lived, yes? You have stories
about the paths you’ve forged, the roads taken–and not taken– and your dreams. In the future, someone like me will want to know you. My life might be changed knowing that you existed.” Genealogist Natalie Zett shares the compelling story of what sparked her interest in family history… { read more }

Be The Change

What does the thought of being a “future ancestor” bring up for you? What does it inspire in you? For more from Natalie Zett, tune in to this in-depth conversarsation with her: “Family Stories, Timeless Connections.” { more }

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Clarksville Elementary School: We Are the World

This week’s inspiring video: Clarksville Elementary School: We Are the World
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Video of the Week

Jul 29, 2021
Clarksville Elementary School: We Are the World

Clarksville Elementary School: We Are the World

All 500 students from Clarksville Elementary School in Indiana worked with their music teacher over the course of the pandemic school year to create this heartwarming music video to showcase their talents and to bring smiles to the world. The exuberance and enthusiasm of these young singers remind us that they are the world, they are the future, and we can all make a better day when we stand together as one.
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For Love of Wild Horses

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July 29, 2021

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For Love of Wild Horses

Sadly, there are more wild horses in holding pens than in the wild.

– Willie Nelson –

For Love of Wild Horses

Wildife biologist, Craig Downer’s, childhood experience with his trusted horse, Poco, and their many adventures in the wild lands of Nevada, led to a lifetime of passionate advocacy for the protection of wild horses and burros in the Western United States. His is often a lonely struggle between raising consciousness about the long term ecological benefits these animals bring and the forces more concerned with short term benefits. The interview, both heart-breaking and inspiring, will give you a new understanding of an issue that needs far more attention… { read more }

Be The Change

Learn more about Craig Downer’s work through his website. { more }

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Neil Douglas-Klotz on The Aramaic Jesus

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July 28, 2021

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Neil Douglas-Klotz on The Aramaic Jesus

Name of names, our small identity unravels in You. You give it back as a lesson.

– Neil Douglas-Klotz –

Neil Douglas-Klotz on The Aramaic Jesus

“This is, what I would say, the beauty of the approach that I have used is common in looking at the Semitic language teachings of various prophets. It’s common among the Sufis today, it’s common among the Jewish mystics, that when you look at the words of a prophet or a mystic or a teacher in the Semitic languages, the language itself allows you to look at it in a number of different ways, from a number of different viewpoints, a number of different levels… And I think that’s the richness of it, that there doesn’t have to be fixed as one particular translation, or one particular meaning. It doesn’t have to be the be-all and end-all or the only meaning. So that’s what I’ve attempted to really do in my work–for instance, in my very first book, Prayers of the Cosmos, [I translated] each line of the Lord’s Prayer, of Jesus’ prayer, five or six different ways. So these are possibilities. No one translation is the definitive translation. But there’s a richness. There’s a breadth there. There’s a depth there in which people can hear what they need to hear and still connect, you could say, through breath, through spirit to the person who said the words.” Tami Simon speaks with Neil Douglas-Klotz, a world-renowned scholar in religious studies, spirituality, and psychology, and the author of ‘Prayers of the Cosmos: Reflections on the Original Meaning of Jesus’s Words,’ and ‘The Hidden Gospel: Decoding the Spiritual Message of the Aramaic Jesus.’ In this episode, Tami speaks with Neil about body prayers and how to appreciate multiple interpretations of scriptural text. { read more }

Be The Change

Join this Saturday’s Awakin Call with Neil Douglas-Klotz, “Breathing Life into Words, Prayers and Scriptures.” More details and RSVP info here. { more }

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Pat McCabe is a Voice for Peace

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July 27, 2021

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Pat McCabe is a Voice for Peace

The first peace, which is the most important, is that which comes within the souls of people when they realize their relationship, their oneness, with the universe and all its powers, and when they realize that at the center of the universe dwells Wakan-Taka (the Great Spirit), and that this center is really everywhere, it is within each of us.

– Black Elk –

Pat McCabe is a Voice for Peace

“Pat McCabe (Weyakpa Najin Win, meaning Woman Stands Shining) is an ambassador between two worlds. A Navajo mother, grandmother, artist and ceremonial leader, she has been deeply immersed in land-based, indigenous ways of living and being. Having grown up in a multicultural neighbourhood next to Stanford University in California, she is also accustomed to the realities of the modern, industrialised world. It makes her an invaluable bridge-builder and cross-cultural communicator, and a powerful voice for the deep and broad transformation needed in the modern world to deal with its ecological and social crises.” More in this in-depth interview with Pat. { read more }

Be The Change

For more inspiration read this short passage from Lao Tzu,”From Wonder into Wonder Existence Opens.” { more }

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Awakin Weekly: Who Me, Stealing?

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InnerNet Weekly: Inspirations from ServiceSpace.org
Who Me, Stealing?
by Constance Habash

[Listen to Audio!]

2507.jpgWhen I’m teaching the five (ethical principles of Yoga), I often feel a little stumped with conveying the practical application of (one of the principles) Asteya (pronounced “uh-stay-uh”), known as “non-stealing”. Most of us think we have that one nailed. Of course, I know not to steal! But the subtle and less obvious applications of Asteya show up in all areas of our life, on and off the mat.

Stealing, according to Webster’s dictionary, means “to take or appropriate without permission, dishonestly, especially in a secret or surreptitious manner”. We steal when we don’t have the means to purchase, the capability to produce (as in ideas or copywritten materials), or when we have the belief that we could not otherwise gain or possess what is desired by honest means. We steal when we feel a lack or a void and are desperate to fill it, be it in our stomach, our closet, or our pride. Stealing encompasses everything from the simple swiping of a loaf of bread to distracting attention away from the one who merited it.

Although few of us, fortunately, have stolen a loaf of bread, we may have, consciously or unconsciously, participated in stealing many times in the past. It’s common to come home from work and end up with pens from the office store room in our drawers, or even from the local gift shop that you automatically put in your purse after signing the credit slip. Some of us in college photocopied material that we did not have permission to, or included information from a source without quoting it while writing an essay. Although these actions do indeed constitute stealing, these are relatively easy behaviors to change, and should be changed to truly embody Asteya.

However, the more subtle and less obvious aspects of Non-Stealing are challenging, and often we have to learn how to see these patterns in order to change them. Usually, stealing in any form emerges from a deep-seated fear. Whether it’s a fear of not finding our next meal or of being inadequate, the roots of fear need to be found and pulled out before the garden of Asteya can flourish.

Greed, a form of stealing, is rampant in the world today and we are seeing the results as our forests dwindle, the poor starve, the skies pollute, and our waters clog with waste and toxins. We may not even be aware of being greedy because its seeds are subtly planted everyday through the media, enticing us to constantly desire and take more and more. From the air we breathe to the cars we drive, most of us consume more than we nurture the earth. Swami Satchidananda says that buying more than we need is actually stealing things “by not letting others use them.”

As we explore Asteya deeper, we realise that it’s not enough to not-steal. Generosity is the heart of Asteya. We give because of the joy of giving, not just in order to receive what we want. When we feel full-filled with what we have and who we are, we find that we have much to offer others. Whether we choose to pass on material things we no longer need or to offer our time, energy, and love, becoming generous and thoughtful beings is at the core of the practice of non-stealing.

Fully embodied in Asteya, non-stealing, we become content and peaceful. A peaceful mind is our greatest wealth.

About the Author:

Connie L. Habash is a yoga teacher, and seeker. The excerpt above is adapted from this blog.

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Who Me, Stealing?
What does non-stealing mean to you? Can you share a personal story of a time you were able to arrive at a subtler awareness of non-stealing? What helps you acknowledge your adequacy?
Jagdish P Dave wrote: As I understand, desire or greed of stealingor non-stealing is born in our mind. When I am aware of what is happening in my mind, my desire or greed for getting something that does not belong to me, I…
Navin sata wrote: RAM NAAMKI LOOT HAI LOOT SAKE TAO LOOT???.1.PEOPLE WHO HAS MORE THEN THEY NEED(GREEDPEOPLE2. WHO HAVE SOME THING BUT WANTS MORE 3.people who have nothing.wants 2 and 1.this is cycle of ignorance know …
David Doane wrote: My understanding is that non-stealing means not taking without permission what is considered to belong to another. It means not taking anything material or immaterial, not money or a car or a paper cl…
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Global call with Neil Douglas-Klotz!
583.jpgJoin us for a conference call this Saturday, with a global group of ServiceSpace friends and our insightful guest speaker. Join the Forest Call >>

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Back in 1997, one person started sending this simple “meditation reminder” to a few friends. Soon after, “Wednesdays” started, ServiceSpace blossomed, and the humble experiments of service took a life of its own. If you’d like to start an Awakin gathering in your area, we’d be happy to help you get started.

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The Descent to Soul: An Overview of the Terrain

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July 26, 2021

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The Descent to Soul: An Overview of the Terrain

Too many of us lack intimacy with the natural world and with our souls, and consequently we are doing untold damage to both.

– Bill Plotkin –

The Descent to Soul: An Overview of the Terrain

“Our developmental dilemma stems primarily from our disconnection from nature, from both our outer and inner natures: the loss of our experienced belonging to and entanglement within the natural world and the loss of our communion with the very core of our own individual human nature our Soul. What we have lost, in particular, is the journey of soul initiation a psycho-spiritual undertaking that connects us in the most profound way to both the Earth community and the source of our deepest humanity. This journey, if revitalized and reclaimed, can transform everything for us, individually and collectively.” Bill Plotkin is the author of “The Journey of Soul Initiation.” As a depth psychologist, wilderness guide, and founder of western Colorado’s Animas Valley Institute, he has led thousands of women and men through nature-based initiatory passages. Here he shares more on the need for soul initiation in our times. { read more }

Be The Change

Learn more about Bill Plotkins and his work and writing here. { more }

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Leverage Points & the Power to Transcend Paradigms

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July 25, 2021

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Leverage Points & the Power to Transcend Paradigms

In the end, it seems that mastery has less to do with pushing leverage points than it does with strategically, profoundly, madly letting go.

– Donella Meadows –

Leverage Points & the Power to Transcend Paradigms

“Folks who do systems analysis have a great belief in ‘leverage points.’ These are places within a complex system (a corporation, an economy, a living body, a city, an ecosystem) where a small shift in one thing can produce big changes in everything. This idea is not unique to systems analysis — it’s embedded in legend. The silver bullet, the trimtab, the miracle cure, the secret passage, the magic password, the single hero who turns the tide of history. The nearly effortless way to cut through or leap over huge obstacles. We not only want to believe that there are leverage points, we want to know where they are and how to get our hands on them. Leverage points are points of power.” In this in-depth piece Donella Meadows, educator, environmental scientist and author of “Limits to Growth,” details her evolving list of “Places to Intervene in a System.” { read more }

Be The Change

What are some of the current paradigms you operate within? What does Donella’s invitation to live into the power to profoundly and madly let go surface for you?

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Spotlight On Kindness: Lived Compassion

All major belief systems agree that “compassion” towards others is generally a good thing. However, in the West, the definition usually involves the words sympathy or even pity. Whereas in the East, daya (compassion) is quite different from kripa (pity). Since all living beings are ultimately seen as a part of one’s own self, ahimsa (compassion-in-action) becomes more than just sympathy or pity. It is actively living in a way that prevents suffering for others. This week we explore the subtle nuances of this word in the video below. –Guri

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Editor’s Note: All major belief systems agree that “compassion” towards others is generally a good thing. However, in the West, the definition usually involves the words sympathy or even pity. Whereas in the East, daya (compassion) is quite different from kripa (pity). Since all living beings are ultimately seen as a part of one’s own self, ahimsa (compassion-in-action) becomes more than just sympathy or pity. It is actively living in a way that prevents suffering for others. This week we explore the subtle nuances of this word in the video below. –Guri
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