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Archive for January, 2014

The Spellbinding Effect of Stories

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DailyGood News That Inspires

January 31, 2014

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The Spellbinding Effect of Stories

Stories can conquer fear, you know. They can make the heart bigger.

– Ben Okri –

The Spellbinding Effect of Stories

Richard Hamilton asks why we love stories and why we love hearing them spoken aloud, in person. He concludes that whatever the evolutionary explanation, narrative seems to occupy a very central position in our thought patterns, that perhaps storytelling is a sort of flight simulator that allows us to practice something without getting hurt. { read more }

Be The Change

Listening and speaking are our central means of communication. This week, listen to what others tell you as if it were a story, and tell a few stories to others, especially children.

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Remembering Pete Seeger

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Video of the Week

Jan 30, 2014
Remembering Pete Seeger

Remembering Pete Seeger

American folk singer Pete Seeger passed away at age 94, leaving a musical legacy that forever altered the sound of popular song and serves as a clarion reminder how powerfully folk art can inspire positive social change. His music touched people all over the world. Perhaps he will be best remembered for adapting an old, forgotten song of the American labor movement of the 1930s and 1940s, to become the soundtrack of the civil rights movement. âWe Shall Overcomeâ is still celebrated today â from Birmingham to Belfast to Bombay â as the ultimate anthem of our shared dreams of a just and hopeful future. This obituary by ABC News captures Pete Seegerâs unique ability to build community through popular song.
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Gardening At The Dragon’s Gate

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DailyGood News That Inspires

January 30, 2014

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Gardening At The Dragon's Gate

In wildness is the preservation of the world.

– Henry David Thoreau –

Gardening At The Dragon’s Gate

Gardening is a fundamental work that demands your energy and heart, and it gives you back great treasures as well. It is all about picking and choosing and following our passion. Read on for a glimpse of one gardener’s beautiful insights gleaned from 25 years at Green Gulch farm. { read more }

Be The Change

Look for work that demands your energy and heart this week, whatever it may be, as you pick and choose and follow your passion.

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A Great Potential for Love

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DailyGood News That Inspires

January 29, 2014

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A Great Potential for Love

For small creatures such as we, the vastness is bearable only through love.

– Carl Sagan –

A Great Potential for Love

“Natalie Batalha hunts for “exoplanets” — Earth-sized planets beyond our own solar system — that might have liquid water and harbor life. …And, I’ve never met anyone who speaks more intriguingly than Natalie Batalha about the connection between science, love, and gratitude for life. She is a luminous voice for the way exploring the heavens — as we do that now — is bringing the beauty of the cosmos and the exuberance of scientific discovery closer home to us all. { read more }

Be The Change

Want to get a better glimpse of the cosmos, or actually become involved in a real-life project? Visit Zooniverse.org for a chance to experience the thrill of discovery. { more }

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Awakin Weekly: What You See Is What You Get

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InnerNet Weekly: Inspirations from ServiceSpace.org
What You See Is What You Get
by Annie Dillard

[Listen to Audio!]

989.jpgWhen I was six or seven years old, growing up in Pittsburgh, I used to take a precious penny of my own and hide it for someone else to find. It was a curious compulsion; sadly, I’ve never been seized by it since. For some reason I always “hid” the penny along the same stretch of sidewalk up the street. I would cradle it at the roots of a sycamore, say, or in a hole left by a chipped-off piece of sidewalk. Then I would take a piece of chalk, and, starting at either end of the block, draw huge arrows leading up to the penny from both directions. After I learned to write I labeled the arrows: SURPRISE AHEAD or MONEY THIS WAY. I was greatly excited, during all this arrow-drawing, at the thought of the first lucky passer-by who would receive in this way, regardless of merit, a free gift from the universe. But I never lurked about. I would go straight home and not give the matter another thought, until, some months later, I would be gripped again by the impulse to hide another penny.

It is still the first week in January, and I’ve got great plans. I’ve been thinking about seeing. There are lots of things to see, unwrapped gifts and free surprises. The world is fairly studded and strewn with pennies cast broadside from a generous hand. But—and this is the point—who gets excited by a mere penny? If you follow one arrow, if you crouch motionless on a bank to watch a tremulous ripple thrill on the water and are rewarded by the sight of a muskrat kid paddling from its den, will you count that sight a chip of copper only, and go your rueful way? It is dire poverty indeed when a man is so malnourished and fatigued that he won’t stoop to pick up a penny. But if you cultivate a healthy poverty and simplicity, so that finding a penny will literally make your day, then, since the world is in fact planted in pennies, you have with your poverty bought a lifetime of days. It is that simple. What you see is what you get.

…For a week last September migrating red-winged blackbirds were feeding heavily down by the creek at the back of the house. One day I went out to investigate the racket; I walked up to a tree, an Osage orange, and a hundred birds flew away. They simply materialized out of the tree. I saw a tree, then a whisk of color, then a tree again. I walked closer and another hundred blackbirds took flight. Not a branch, not a twig budged: the birds were apparently weightless as well as invisible. Or, it was as if the leaves of the Osage orange had been freed from a spell in the form of red- winged blackbirds; they flew from the tree, caught my eye in the sky, and vanished. […] These appearances catch at my throat; they are the free gifts, the bright coppers at the roots of trees.

It’s all a matter of keeping my eyes open.

Awakin Weekly: Deep Inquiry: Not for the Faint of Heart

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InnerNet Weekly: Inspirations from ServiceSpace.org
Deep Inquiry: Not for the Faint of Heart
by Gangaji

[Listen to Audio!]

987.jpgAuthentic spiritual inquiry reveals the joy of fresh insights and revelation, just as artistic or scientific inquiry does, but if we cling to the latest insight as a thing we know, that thing grows stale.

To be of real spiritual value, inquiry must be alive and fresh. Regardless of what we remember or have discovered from the past, each time we truly inquire, we return to not knowing what the outcome will or should be. No doctrine is needed for discovery. No concepts of multiplicity, duality, or non-duality are needed. In fact, we must put aside all of our doctrines and concepts for our inquiry. All that is needed is the willingness to be unattached to the outcome, conscious, and truthful.
Deep inquiry is not for the fainthearted or weak-minded. It is for those who are ready and willing, regardless of fears and discomforts. It is the challenge and invitation to mature. It is the invitation to give up past reliance on others’ discoveries while allowing those discoveries to encourage and even push us into our own inquiry.

Inquiry is not a coping mechanism. It is not present in human consciousness to provide certainty or comfort, except the sublime certainty that one has the capacity to discover truth for oneself. It is a stretching mechanism. It calls on the mind to stretch beyond its known frontiers, and in this way inquiry is support for maturing and evolving the soul. It frees us from the need to define ourselves to experience being ourselves. It is both humbling and a source of profound joy, but it does not provide a neat package of new definitions and stories.

The challenge in inquiry is to be willing to directly discover what exists with no reference points. Inquiry is no small challenge, for it requires facing the death of the inner and outer worlds as they have been constructed with no knowledge of what will take their place. We have the experience of releasing our constructed world when we fall into sleep, and we cherish and need this experience for our well-being on all levels.

The challenge of inquiry appears in releasing the constructed world while remaining conscious.
Gangaji

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Latest Community Insights New!
Deep Inquiry: Not for the Faint of Heart
What does deep inquiry mean to you? Can you share a personal story around fears that you had to overcome in order to engage in authentic deep inquiry? What do you understand by “releasing the constructed world while remaining conscious?”
Kokil wrote: For me deep inquiry means questioning within and not outside. In my journey of introspection the biggest fear that I am now coming to terms with is the fear of the unknown. Everytime I would th…
Jagdish P Dave wrote: To me, inquiry is a curiosity to understand me and others in my life. The starting point and the continuing point is me and that ongoing process includes the outer world the people I relate to….
Conrad P Pritscher wrote: In the past I thought I knew what inquiry means. Now I do not know. In the past I was afraid of not knowing. Today I am much less afraid of not knowingand often cherish not knowing. What I unde…
Conrad P Pritscher wrote: I forgot to mention that if one notices one is faint of heart, that may be a condition for them to become less faint if that is what they wish to be. I do not know how faint in the sense the au…
david doane wrote: That’s quite a thorough and excellent statement about inquiry. I like the author’s emphasis on releasing one’s constructed world, being detached from any doctrine or expectation of what t…
Share/Read Reflections >>
Awakin Wednesdays:
Many years ago, a couple friends got together to sit in silence for an hour, and share personal aha-moments. That birthed this newsletter, and later became “Wednesdays”, which now ripple out to living rooms around the world. To join, RSVP online.

RSVP For Wednesday

Some Good News

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A Mother, A Son & An iPad
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Global call with Shital Mehta!
130.jpgJoin us for a conference call this Saturday, with a global group of ServiceSpace friends and our insightful guest speaker. Join the Forest Call >>

About
Back in 1997, one person started sending this simple “meditation reminder” to a few friends. Soon after, “Wednesdays” started, ServiceSpace blossomed, and the humble experiments of service took a life of its own. If you’d like to start an Awakin gathering in your area, we’d be happy to help you get started.

Forward to a Friend

InnerNet Weekly is an email service that delivers a little bit of wisdom to 82,678 subscribers each week. We never spam nor do we host any advertising. Archives, from the last 14+ years, are freely available online.

You can unsubscribe anytime, within seconds.

A Gift Economy offering of ServiceSpace.org (2012)

A Great Potential for Love

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DailyGood News That Inspires

January 28, 2014

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A Great Potential for Love

For small creatures such as we, the vastness is bearable only through love.

– Carl Sagan –

A Great Potential for Love

“Natalie Batalha hunts for “exoplanets” — Earth-sized planets beyond our own solar system — that might have liquid water and harbor life. …And, I’ve never met anyone who speaks more intriguingly than Natalie Batalha about the connection between science, love, and gratitude for life. She is a luminous voice for the way exploring the heavens — as we do that now — is bringing the beauty of the cosmos and the exuberance of scientific discovery closer home to us all. { read more }

Be The Change

Want to get a better glimpse of the cosmos, or actually become involved in a real-life project? Visit Zooniverse.org for a chance to experience the thrill of discovery. { more }

COMMENT | RATE Email Twitter FaceBook

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Bright Ideas to Simplfy Your ‘Stuff’

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DailyGood News That Inspires

January 21, 2014

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Bright Ideas to Simplfy Your 'Stuff'

Simplicity is the ultimate sophistication.

– Leonardo da Vinci –

Bright Ideas to Simplfy Your ‘Stuff’

Whether it be through sharing, repairing or changing the rules there are myriad ways in which we can simplify our lives. In this article, writer Shannan Stoll offers up six different paths to simplicity and illustrative stories to go with them. Such as the story of the Fixers Collective in NY, a group that dedicates space, tools, and support for monthly repair sessions where folks in the community can bring in broken items for fixing. { read more }

Be The Change

Challenge yourself by trying to fix or repair something around your home that you otherwise would just throw away and buy a new one. { more }

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DailyGood is a volunteer-run initiative that delivers “good news” to 139,850 subscribers. There are many ways to help. To unsubscribe, click here.

Other ServiceSpace projects include:

KindSpring // KarmaTube // Conversations // Awakin // More

Awakin Weekly: Deep Inquiry: Not for the Faint of Heart

Email not displaying correctly? View it in your browser.
InnerNet Weekly: Inspirations from ServiceSpace.org
Deep Inquiry: Not for the Faint of Heart
by Gangaji

[Listen to Audio!]

987.jpgAuthentic spiritual inquiry reveals the joy of fresh insights and revelation, just as artistic or scientific inquiry does, but if we cling to the latest insight as a thing we know, that thing grows stale.

To be of real spiritual value, inquiry must be alive and fresh. Regardless of what we remember or have discovered from the past, each time we truly inquire, we return to not knowing what the outcome will or should be. No doctrine is needed for discovery. No concepts of multiplicity, duality, or non-duality are needed. In fact, we must put aside all of our doctrines and concepts for our inquiry. All that is needed is the willingness to be unattached to the outcome, conscious, and truthful.
Deep inquiry is not for the fainthearted or weak-minded. It is for those who are ready and willing, regardless of fears and discomforts. It is the challenge and invitation to mature. It is the invitation to give up past reliance on others’ discoveries while allowing those discoveries to encourage and even push us into our own inquiry.

Inquiry is not a coping mechanism. It is not present in human consciousness to provide certainty or comfort, except the sublime certainty that one has the capacity to discover truth for oneself. It is a stretching mechanism. It calls on the mind to stretch beyond its known frontiers, and in this way inquiry is support for maturing and evolving the soul. It frees us from the need to define ourselves to experience being ourselves. It is both humbling and a source of profound joy, but it does not provide a neat package of new definitions and stories.

The challenge in inquiry is to be willing to directly discover what exists with no reference points. Inquiry is no small challenge, for it requires facing the death of the inner and outer worlds as they have been constructed with no knowledge of what will take their place. We have the experience of releasing our constructed world when we fall into sleep, and we cherish and need this experience for our well-being on all levels.

The challenge of inquiry appears in releasing the constructed world while remaining conscious.
Gangaji

Share the Wisdom:
Email Twitter FaceBook
Latest Community Insights New!
Deep Inquiry: Not for the Faint of Heart
What does deep inquiry mean to you? Can you share a personal story around fears that you had to overcome in order to engage in authentic deep inquiry? What do you understand by “releasing the constructed world while remaining conscious?”
Kokil wrote: For me deep inquiry means questioning within and not outside. In my journey of introspection the biggest fear that I am now coming to terms with is the fear of the unknown. Everytime I would th…
Jagdish P Dave wrote: To me, inquiry is a curiosity to understand me and others in my life. The starting point and the continuing point is me and that ongoing process includes the outer world the people I relate to….
Conrad P Pritscher wrote: In the past I thought I knew what inquiry means. Now I do not know. In the past I was afraid of not knowing. Today I am much less afraid of not knowingand often cherish not knowing. What I unde…
Conrad P Pritscher wrote: I forgot to mention that if one notices one is faint of heart, that may be a condition for them to become less faint if that is what they wish to be. I do not know how faint in the sense the au…
david doane wrote: That’s quite a thorough and excellent statement about inquiry. I like the author’s emphasis on releasing one’s constructed world, being detached from any doctrine or expectation of what t…
Share/Read Reflections >>
Awakin Wednesdays:
Many years ago, a couple friends got together to sit in silence for an hour, and share personal aha-moments. That birthed this newsletter, and later became “Wednesdays”, which now ripple out to living rooms around the world. To join, RSVP online.

RSVP For Wednesday

Some Good News

This Will Make You Smarter
A Mother, A Son & An iPad
The Healing Power of Presence

Video of the Week

Martin Luther King’s “I Have a Dream” Speech

Kindness Stories

Hotel Door Tag!
Healing Through Hugs
An Apple A Day Keeps Sadness At Bay!

Global call with Shital Mehta!
130.jpgJoin us for a conference call this Saturday, with a global group of ServiceSpace friends and our insightful guest speaker. Join the Forest Call >>

About
Back in 1997, one person started sending this simple “meditation reminder” to a few friends. Soon after, “Wednesdays” started, ServiceSpace blossomed, and the humble experiments of service took a life of its own. If you’d like to start an Awakin gathering in your area, we’d be happy to help you get started.

Forward to a Friend

InnerNet Weekly is an email service that delivers a little bit of wisdom to 82,678 subscribers each week. We never spam nor do we host any advertising. Archives, from the last 14+ years, are freely available online.

You can unsubscribe anytime, within seconds.

A Gift Economy offering of ServiceSpace.org (2012)

Martin Luther King’s I Have A Dream Speech

You’re receiving this email because you are a DailyGood subscriber.
Trouble Viewing? On a mobile? Just click here. Not interested anymore? Unsubscribe.
DailyGood News That Inspires

January 20, 2014

a project of ServiceSpace

Martin Luther King's I Have A Dream Speech

Our lives begin and end the day we become silent about things that matter.

– Martin Luther King Jr. –

Martin Luther King’s I Have A Dream Speech

Marked by one of the most famous speeches given by Martin Luther King, Jr., titled ‘I Have a Dream,’ the ‘March on Washington’ on August 28, 1963, was the largest civil rights demonstration in history. Watch this historic footage of the speech, given on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial more than 50 years ago. It inspires a rededication to Martin Luther King Jr.’s dream of liberty, justice, equality, and opportunity for all. { read more }

Be The Change

Learn more about the life and work of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. at The King Center, which has more than 10,000 browsable documents in its digital archives. { more }

COMMENT | RATE Email Twitter FaceBook

Related Good News

Smile Big
Love Freely
Meditate
Give Back

No Greater Joy: Photos from Around the World

The One Thing They Carried With Them

The College Course That’s Changing Lives

The Science of Love

Smile Big
Love Freely
Meditate
Give Back

Building A Regret Free Life

16 Habits of Exuberant Human Beings

Resilience: The Opposite of Depression

Bill Gates vs. Mother Teresa

DailyGood is a volunteer-run initiative that delivers “good news” to 139,799 subscribers. There are many ways to help. To unsubscribe, click here.

Other ServiceSpace projects include:

KindSpring // KarmaTube // Conversations // Awakin // More